Nadja

Front Cover
Grove Press, 1960 - Fiction - 160 pages
122 Reviews
"Nadja, " originally published in France in 1928, is the first and perhaps best Surrealist romance ever written, a book which defined that movement's attitude toward everyday life.

The principal narrative is an account of the author's relationship with a girl in teh city of Paris, the story of an obsessional presence haunting his life. The first-person narrative is supplemented by forty-four photographs which form an integral part of the work -- pictures of various "surreal" people, places, and objects which the author visits or is haunted by in naja's presence and which inspire him to mediate on their reality or lack of it. "The Nadja of the book is a girl, but, like Bertrand Russell's definition of electricity as "not so much a thing as a way things happen, " Nadja is not so much a person as the way she makes people behave. She has been described as a state of mind, a feeling about reality, k a kind of vision, and the reader sometimes wonders whether she exists at all. yet it is Nadja who gives form and structure to the novel.
  

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5 stars
31
4 stars
31
3 stars
38
2 stars
12
1 star
10

Collage writing about love. - Goodreads
The pictures too seem to point to a poverty of spirit. - Goodreads
This is one of my favorite books as a writer. - Goodreads
This part of the book was extremely hard to read. - Goodreads
The pictures were nice. - Goodreads
This writing is a particularly obscure one. - Goodreads

Review: Nadja

User Review  - Jeffrey Bumiller - Goodreads

A great piece of surrealist lit. Often very beautiful. Read full review

Review: Nadja

User Review  - Left Sr - Goodreads

I found parts of it heartbreaking, beautiful... But most of it willfully obscure as only Breton can be. Read full review

Contents

I
21
II
22
III
25
IV
26
V
29
VI
30
VII
33
VIII
34
XXIII
95
XXIV
96
XXV
103
XXVI
104
XXVII
109
XXVIII
110
XXIX
117
XXX
119

IX
35
X
36
XI
43
XII
44
XIII
47
XIV
53
XV
54
XVI
57
XVII
58
XVIII
75
XIX
81
XX
82
XXI
87
XXII
88
XXXI
120
XXXII
123
XXXIII
124
XXXIV
125
XXXV
126
XXXVI
127
XXXVII
128
XXXVIII
131
XXXIX
132
XL
133
XLI
134
XLII
137
XLIII
149
Copyright

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About the author (1960)

Andre Breton was born in Normandy, France on 19, 1896 and died on September 28, 1966. Breton was a poet, novelist, philosophical essayist, and art critic. He is considered to be the father of surrealism. From World War I to the 1940s, Breton was at the forefront of the numerous avant-garde activities that centered in Paris. Breton's influence on the art and literature of the twentieth century has been enormous. Picasso, Derain, Magritte, Giacometti, Cocteau, Eluard, and Gracq are among the many whose work was affected by his thinking. From 1927 to 1933, Breton was a member of the Communist party, but thereafter he opposed communism. His writings include the first Surrealist Manifesto (Manifeste du surréalisme) of 1924, in which he defined surrealism as "pure psychic automatism". He also wrote Nadja in 1928. Breton died in 1966 at 70 and was buried in the Cimetière des Batignolles in Paris.

Bibliographic information