Itinerary of General Washington from June 15, 1775, to December 23, 1783 (Google eBook)

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William Spohn Baker
J.B. Lippincott, 1892 - 334 pages
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Page 321 - Having now finished the work assigned me, I retire from the great theatre of action, and bidding an affectionate farewell to this august body, under whose orders I have so long acted, I here offer my commission, and take my leave of all the employments of public life.
Page 315 - Filling a glass, he turned to them and said, "with a heart full of love and gratitude, I now take leave of you ; I most devoutly wish that your latter days may be as prosperous and happy, as your former ones have been glorious and honorable.
Page 4 - And you are to observe and follow such Orders and Directions from Time to Time, as you shall receive from this or a future Congress...
Page 112 - I can assure those gentlemen that it is a much easier and less distressing thing to draw remonstrances in a comfortable room by a good fireside than to occupy a cold, bleak hill and sleep under frost and snow without clothes or blankets.
Page 263 - I am much at a loss to conceive what part of my conduct could have given encouragement to an address which to me seems big with the greatest mischiefs that can befall my country. If I am not deceived in the knowledge of myself, you could not have found a person to whom your schemes are more disagreeable.
Page 263 - With a mixture of great surprise and astonishment I have read with attention the sentiments you have submitted to my perusal. Be assured, sir, no occurrence in the course of the war has given me more painful sensations than your information of there being such ideas existing in the army as you have expressed, and I must view with abhorrence and reprehend with severity.
Page 32 - And took off their chariot wheels, that they drave them heavily : so that the Egyptians said, Let us flee from the face of Israel; for the Lord fighteth for them against the Egyptians.
Page 59 - Voltaire has remarked, that King William never appeared to full advantage but in difficulties and in action; the same remark may be made on General Washington, for the Character fits him. There is a natural firmness in some minds which cannot be unlocked by trifles, but which, when unlocked, discovers a cabinet of fortitude...
Page 129 - KALB'S OATH OF ALLEGIANCE I, John Baron de Kalb, Major General, do acknowledge the United States of America to be Free, Independent and Sovereign States, and declare, that the people thereof owe no allegiance or obedience to George the Third, King of Great Britain...
Page 3 - I should enjoy more real happiness in one month with you at home, than I have the most distant prospect of finding abroad, if my stay were to be seven times seven years. But as it has been a kind of destiny, that has thrown me upon this service, I shall hope that my undertaking it is designed to answer some good purpose.

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