When A Billion Chinese Jump: How China Will Save Mankind -- Or Destroy It (Google eBook)

Front Cover
Simon and Schuster, Oct 26, 2010 - Political Science - 448 pages
9 Reviews
As a young child, Jonathan Watts believed if everyone in China jumped at the same time, the earth would be shaken off its axis, annihilating mankind. Now, more than thirty years later, as a correspondent for The Guardian in Beijing, he has discovered it is not only foolish little boys who dread a planet-shaking leap by the world’s most populous nation.


When a Billion Chinese Jump
is a road journey into the future of our species. Traveling from the mountains of Tibet to the deserts of Inner Mongolia via the Silk Road, tiger farms, cancer villages, weather-modifying bases, and eco-cities, Watts chronicles the environmental impact of economic growth with a series of gripping stories from the country on the front line of global development. He talks to nomads and philosophers, entrepreneurs and scientists, rural farmers and urban consumers, examining how individuals are trying to adapt to one of the most spectacular bursts of change in human history, then poses a question that will affect all of our lives: Can China find a new way forward or is this giant nation doomed to magnify the mistakes that have already taken humanity to the brink of disaster?
  

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Review: When A Billion Chinese Jump: How China Will Save Mankind Or Destroy It

User Review  - Michael Saugstad - Goodreads

Unnecessarily sensationalist, but I should expect that from a journalist. Watts has a lot of interesting first hand experience to draw from as he articulates some of the complex and serious environmental issues that China is facing. Read full review

Review: When A Billion Chinese Jump: How China Will Save Mankind Or Destroy It

User Review  - Goodreads

Unnecessarily sensationalist, but I should expect that from a journalist. Watts has a lot of interesting first hand experience to draw from as he articulates some of the complex and serious environmental issues that China is facing. Read full review

Contents

Useless TreesShangriLa
3
Foolish Old MenThe Tibetan Plateau
24
Still Waters Moving EarthSichuan
43
Fishing with ExplosivesHubei and Guangxi
62
Made in China?Guangdong
83
Gross Domestic PollutionJiangsu and Zhejiang
99
From Horizontal Green to Vertical GrayChongqing
118
Shop Till You DropShanghai
130
Attack the Clouds Retreat from the Sands Gansu and Ningxia
187
Flaming Mountain Melting HeavenXinjiang
204
Alternatives
223
Science versus MathTianjin Hebei and Liaoning
225
Fertility TreatmentShandong
249
An Odd Sort of DictatorshipHeilongjiang
269
Grass RootsXanadu
294
Peaking Man
318

Imbalance
149
Why Do So Many People Hate Henan?Henan
151
The Carbon TrapShanxi and Shaanxi
170
Acknowledgments
327
Index
423
Copyright

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About the author (2010)

Jonathan S. Watts graduated with a BA in religious studies from Princeton University in 1989 and an MA in human sciences from the Saybrook Institute in 2002. He has been a researcher at the Jodo Shu Research Institute in Tokyo since 1999 and the International Buddhist Exchange Center since 2005. He has also been an associate professor of Buddhist studies at Keio University, Tokyo, and has been on the executive board of the International Network of Engaged Buddhists (INEB) since 2003. He has coauthored and edited Never Die Alone: Birth as Death in Pure Land Buddhism, Rethinking Karma: The Dharma of Social Justice, This Precious Life: Buddhist Tsunami Relief, and Anti-Nuclear Activism in Post 3/11 Japan.

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