Information Technology for Counterterrorism:: Immediate Actions and Future Possibilities

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National Academies Press, Mar 7, 2003 - Computers - 144 pages
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Information technology (IT) is essential to virtually all of the nation s critical infrastructures making them vulnerable by a terrorist attack on their IT system. An attack could be on the system itself or use the IT system to launch or exacerbate another type of attack. IT can also be used as a counterterrorism tool. The report concludes that the most devastating consequences of a terrorist attack would occur if it were on or used IT as part of a broader attack. The report presents two recommendations on what can be done in the short term to protect the nation s communications and information systems and several recommendations about what can be done over the longer term. The report also notes the importance of considering how an IT system will be deployed to maximize protection against and usefulness in responding to attacks.
  

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Contents

Background and Introduction
10
12 THE ROLE OF INFORMATION TECHNOLOGY IN NATIONAL LIFE AND IN COUNTERTERRORISM
11
13 THE INFORMATION TECHNOLOGY INFRASTRUCTURE AND ASSOCIATED RISKS
12
Types of Threats Associated with Information Technology Infrastructure
15
22 OTHER POSSIBILITIES FOR ATTACK INVOLVING IT
16
222 Attacks on the Public Switched Network
18
223 The Financial System
20
225 Control Systems in the National Critical Infrastructure
21
326 Emergency Sensor Deployment
60
327 Precise Location Identification
61
328 Mapping the Physical Aspects of the Telecommunications Infrastructure
62
33 INFORMATION FUSION
63
331 Data Mining
68
332 Data Interoperability
69
334 Image and Video Processing
70
336 Interaction and Visualization
71

226 Dedicated Computing Facilities
23
POSSIBILITY LIKELIHOOD AND IMPACT
24
Investing in Information Technology Research
28
31 INFORMATION AND NETWORK SECURITY
31
311 Authentication
33
312 Detection
35
313 Containment
37
314 Recovery
40
315 Crosscutting Issues in Information and Network Security Research
41
32 SYSTEMS FOR EMERGENCY RESPONSE
46
321 Intra and Interoperability
47
322 Emergency Deployment of Communications Capacity
55
323 Security of Rapidly Deployed Ad Hoc Networks
57
324 Information Management and DecisionSupport Tools
58
325 Communications with the Public During an Emergency
59
35 OTHER IMPORTANT TECHNOLOGY AREAS
75
352 Sensors
76
353 Simulation and Modeling
78
36 PEOPLE AND ORGANIZATIONS
80
361 Principles of HumanCentered Design
81
362 Organizational Practices in ITEnabled Companies and Agencies
89
363 Dealing with Organizational Resistance to Interagency Cooperation
91
364 Principles into Practice
93
365 Implications for Research
95
What Can Be Done Now?
97
Rationalizing the Future Research Agenda
106
Biographies of Committee and Staff Members
115
What Is CSTB?
127
Copyright

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Page v - JOHN M. CIOFFI, Stanford University ELAINE COHEN, University of Utah W. BRUCE CROFT, University of Massachusetts at Amherst THOMAS E.
Page xii - Council, he was responsible for making certain that an independent examination of this report was carried out in accordance with institutional procedures and that all review comments were canrt'ulK considered.
Page v - MARGARET HUYNH, Senior Project Assistant DAVID DRAKE, Senior Project Assistant JANICE SABUDA, Senior Project Assistant JENNIFER BISHOP, Senior Project Assistant BRANDYE WILLIAMS, Staff Assistant For more information on CSTB, see its Web site at <http://www.

About the author (2003)

Hennessy, Stanford University, Stanford, CA.

Patterson, University of California, Berkeley, CA.

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