The Art of Criticism: Henry James on the Theory and the Practice of Fiction

Front Cover
University of Chicago Press, Jun 15, 1986 - Literary Criticism - 517 pages
1 Review
In The Art of Criticism, William Veeder and Susan M. Griffin have brought together for the first time the best of the Master's critical work: the most important of his Prefaces, which R. P. Blackmur has called "the most sustained and I think the most eloquent and original piece of literary criticism in existence"; his studies of Hawthorne, George Eliot, Balzac, Zola, de Maupassant, Turgenev, Sante-Beuve, and Arnold; and his essays on the function of criticism and the future of the novel.

The editors have provided what James himself emphasized in his literary criticism—the text's context. Each selection is framed by an editorial commentary and notes which give its biographical, bibliographical, and critical background and cite other references in James' work to the topic discussed. This framework, along with the editors' introduction, gives the reader a sense of the place of these pieces in the history of criticism.
  

What people are saying - Write a review

We haven't found any reviews in the usual places.

Contents

II
13
IV
26
V
50
VI
61
VIII
103
XI
134
XII
167
XIV
199
XXII
288
XXIV
302
XXV
318
XXVI
332
XXVIII
348
XXX
363
XXXI
378
XXXII
427

XVI
234
XVII
244
XIX
261
XXI
273
XXXIV
462
XXXV
493
XXXVII
505
Copyright

Common terms and phrases

References to this book

All Book Search results »

About the author (1986)

Henry James, American novelist and literary critic, was born in 1843 in New York City. Psychologist-philosopher William James was his brother. By the age of 18, he had lived in France, England, Switzerland, Germany, and New England. In 1876, he moved to London, having decided to live abroad permanently. James was a prolific writer; his writings include 22 novels, 113 tales, 15 plays, approximately 10 books of criticism, and 7 travel books. His best-known works include Daisy Miller, The Turn of the Screw, The Portrait of a Lady, The Ambassadors, and The American Scene. His works of fiction are elegant and articulate looks at Victorian society; while primarily set in genteel society, James subtlely explores class issues, sexual repression, and psychological distress. Henry James died in 1916 in London. The James Memorial Stone in Poet's Corner, Westminster Abbey, commemorates him.

Griffin has won dozens of awards for her work as a feminist, poet, writer, essayist, playwright, and filmmaker.

Bibliographic information