A Glossary of Words Used in Swaledale, Yorkshire, Volume 4, Issue 1 (Google eBook)

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English dialect society, 1876 - English language - 28 pages
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Page xvii - Holborn, in London, and to the Black Swan, in Coney-street, m York. At both which places they may be received in a stagecoach every Monday, Wednesday, and Friday, which performs the whole journey in four days, (if God permits,) and sets forth at five in the morning.
Page 42 - Worth, p. 304. [Here Fuller quotes a Northumbrian Proverb : ' A Yule feast may be quat at Pasche. That is, Christmas cheer may be digested, and the party hungry again at Easter. No happiness is so lasting but in short time we must forego, and may forget it.'] Race measure.
Page 44 - They chuse eight of the largest and best whitings out of every boat, when they come home from that fishery, and sell them apart from the rest; and out of this separate money is a feast made every Christmas Eve, which they call rumball. The master of each boat provides this feast for his own company, so that there are as many different entertainments as there are boats. These whitings they call also rumbal •whitings. He conjectures, probably enough, that this word is a corruption from Rumwold; and...
Page 58 - A Knight of Cales, A Gentleman of Wales, And a Laird of the North Countree ; A Yeoman of Kent, With his yearly rent. Will buy them out all three...
Page 59 - Earl of Essex, to the number of sixty; whereof (though many of great birth) some were of low fortunes : and therefore Queen Elizabeth was half offended with the Earl for making knighthood so common. Of the numerousness of Welch gentlemen nothing need be said, the Welch generally pretending to gentility.
Page 76 - Some part of Kent hath health and no wealth, viz. East Kent; some wealth and no health, viz. the Weald of Kent; some both health and wealth, viz. the middle of the country and parts near London.
Page xv - Allatson, shall take nine of each sort, to be cut as aforesaid, and to be taken on your backs and carried to the town of Whitby, and to be there before nine of the clock the same day before mentioned.
Page 20 - Leet, has been discontinued about fifty years : and the Borsholder, who is put in by the Quarter Sessions for Watringbury, claims over the whole parish. This Dumb Borsholder is made of wood, about three feet and half an inch long, with an iron ring at the top, and four more by the sides...
Page xv - Percy, shall take twenty-one of each sort, to be cut in the same manner ; and you. Allatson, shall take nine of each sort, to be cut as aforesaid, and to be taken on your backs, and carried to the town of Whitby, and to be there before nine of the clock the same...
Page xv - Out on you, for the heinous Crime of you. And if you and your Successors do refuse this Service, so long as it shall not bo full Sea, at that Hour aforesaid, you, and yours, shall forfeit all your Lands to the Abbot of Whitby or his Successors.

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