Augustan Poetry and the Roman Republic

Front Cover
Joseph Farrell, Damien P. Nelis
Oxford University Press, Jun 13, 2013 - History - 393 pages
0 Reviews
Augustan Poetry and the Roman Republic explores the liminal status of the Augustan period, with its inherent tensions between a rhetoric based on the idea of res publica restituta and the expression of the need for a radical renewal of the Roman political system. It attempts to examine some of the ways in which the Augustan poets dealt with these and other related issues by discussing the many ways in which individual texts handle the idea of the Roman Republic. Focusing on the works of the major Augustan poets, Vergil, Horace, Propertius, and Ovid, the contributions in this collection look at the under-studied aspect of their poetry, namely the way in which they constructed and investigated images of the Roman Republic and the Roman past.
  

What people are saying - Write a review

We haven't found any reviews in the usual places.

Contents

Introduction
1
Intersecting Developments of Roman Identity in Virgil
19
How and What Augustan Literature Remembers Horace Odes 27 Virgil Ecl 1 and Propertius 119 122 and 213B
40
3 Camillus in Ovids Fasti
57
The Fabii and the Claudii
89
The Archaeology of Roman History in Aeneid 2
107
6 Virgils Bacchus and the Roman Republic
124
7 Caesar Lucan and the Massilian Marathonomachia
146
11 Numa in Augustan Poetry
228
12 Past Present and Future in Virgils Georgics
244
13 Catullus 64 and the Prophetic Voice in Virgils Fourth Eclogue
263
Intertextuality and Ideology
278
15 The Domus of Fama and Republican Space in Ovids Metamorphoses
297
16 Afterword
319
References
333
Index Locorum
367

Virgils Andromache between Politics and Poetics in Charles Baudelaires Le Cygne
161
9 Horaces Epistle 21 Cicero Varro and the Ancient Debate about the Origins and the Development of Latin Poetry
180
The History of the Republic in Horaces Lyric Poetry
205

Common terms and phrases

About the author (2013)


Joseph Farrell is Professor of Classical Studies in the University of Pennsylvania.

Damien Nelis is Professor of Latin at the University of Geneva.

Bibliographic information