In the Peanut Gallery with Mystery Science Theater 3000: Essays on Film, Fandom, Technology and the Culture of Riffing (Google eBook)

Front Cover
Robert G. Weiner, Shelley E. Barba
McFarland, Mar 4, 2011 - Performing Arts - 277 pages
5 Reviews
The award-winning television series Mystery Science Theater 3000 (1988-1999) has been described as "the smartest, funniest show in America," and forever changed the way we watch movies. The series featured a human host and a pair of robotic puppets who, while being subjected to some of the worst films ever made, provided ongoing hilarious and insightful commentary in a style popularly known as "riffing." These essays represent the first full-length scholarly analysis of Mystery Science Theater 3000--MST3K--which blossomed from humble beginnings as a Minnesota public-access television show into a cultural phenomenon on two major cable networks. The book includes interviews with series creator Joel Hodgson and cast members Kevin Murphy and Trace Beaulieu.
  

What people are saying - Write a review

User ratings

5 stars
1
4 stars
0
3 stars
1
2 stars
3
1 star
0

LibraryThing Review

User Review  - markfinl - LibraryThing

This collection of essays regarding Mystery Science Theater 3000 manages to pull off something I would have thought impossible. It made MST3K seem boring. The articles written are far too academic for ... Read full review

Review: In the Peanut Gallery with Mystery Science Theater 3000: Essays on Film, Fandom, Technology and the Culture of Riffing

User Review  - Amy - Goodreads

Some things shouldn't be over-analyzed; MST3K is one of them. Read full review

Contents

Riffing and You and Riffing
1
Foreword by Robert Moses Peaslee
3
Introduction
7
Directors
17
Specific Films
39
Fandom
65
Media Texts Audiences and the Culture of Riffing
109
Mental Hygiene
145
Satire and Gender
171
Technology and Episode Collecting
183
History and PreHistory
219
Afterword
253
About the Contributors
255
Index
259
Copyright

Common terms and phrases

About the author (2011)

Robert G. Weiner is associate humanities librarian at Texas Tech University. His works have been published in the Journal of Popular Culture, Public Library Quarterly, Journal of American Culture, International Journal of Comic Art and Popular Music and Society. He lives in Lubbock, Texas. Shelley E. Barba has written for Texas Library Journal. She is a metadata librarian at Texas Tech University.

Bibliographic information