Charlie and the Chocolate Factory

Front Cover
Dramatic Publishing, Jan 1, 1976 - Juvenile Fiction - 60 pages
16 Reviews
Celebrate fifty years of "Charlie and the Chocolate Factory"
First published in 1964 with whimsical illustrations by Joseph Schindelman, Roald Dahl's "Charlie and the Chocolate Factory" became an instant classic. Now this special commemorative edition brings back Schindelman's beloved original illustrations. Perfect for old fans and new fans alike, it's sure to become a treasured family favorite.
  

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Willy Wonka's famous chocolate factory is opening at last! But only five lucky children will be allowed inside. And the winners are: Augustus Gloop, an enormously fat boy whose hobby is eating; Veruca Salt. a spoiled-rotten brat whose parents are wrapped around her little finger; Violet Beauregarde, a dim-witted gum-chewer with the fastest jays around; Mike Teavee, a toy pistol-toting gangster-in-training who is obsessed with television; and Charlie Bucket, Our Hero, a boy who is honest and kind, brave and true, and good and ready for the wildest time of his life! 

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I liked this book because it had a lot of adventures in it.

Selected pages

Contents

Section 1
5
Section 2
50
Section 3
51
Section 4
53
Section 5
55
Section 6
57
Section 7
62
Copyright

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References to this book

Interpreting Folklore
Alan Dundes
Limited preview - 1980
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About the author (1976)

Roald (pronounced "Roo-aal") was born in Llandaff, South Wales. He had a relatively uneventful childhood and was educated at Repton School. During World War II he served as a fighter pilot and for a time was stationed in Washington, D.C.. Prompted by an interviewer, he turned an account of one of his war experiences into a short story that was accepted by the Saturday Evening Post, which were eventually collected in Over to You (1946). Dahl's stories are often described as horror tales or fantasies, but neither description does them justice. He has the ability to treat the horrible and ghastly with a light touch, sometimes even with a humorous one. His tales never become merely shocking or gruesome. His purpose is not to shock but to entertain, and much of the entertainment comes from the unusual twists in his plots, rather than from grizzly details. Dahl has also become famous as a writer of children's stories. In some circles, these works have cased great controversy. Critics have charged that Dahl's work is anti-Semitic and degrades women. Nevertheless, his work continues to be read: Charlie and Chocolate Factory (1964) was made into a successful movie, and his books of rhymes for children continue to be very popular.

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