Heading West

Front Cover
Simon and Schuster, Jul 1, 1995 - Fiction - 368 pages
4 Reviews
The author of Souls Raised from the Dead now offers a gripping novel that combines the suspense of a thriller with the exhilarating story of a woman's bumpy journey toward liberation. A small-town librarian with big dreams is resigned to a dull vacation with her sister and brother-in-law--until a thief accosts the group and kidnaps her.
  

What people are saying - Write a review

Review: Heading West

User Review  - Rachel - Goodreads

After reading this book (which is the first novel by Doris Betts I've read), I found an interview where she says there are some things she would change about this book. I wonder what they are. I loved ... Read full review

Review: Heading West

User Review  - Ashley Delgado - Goodreads

In Heading West, by Doris Betts, Nancy Finch, a loving and caring woman towards her friends and family, gets kidnapped on a trip by a man. The man is full of mystery, but he has a kind vibe. If I were ... Read full review

Common terms and phrases

About the author (1995)

Doris Betts was born Doris June Waugh in Statesville, North Carolina on June 4, 1932. She graduated from the University of North Carolina at Greensboro, where as a sophomore she won the Mademoiselle College Fiction contest for the story Mr. Shawn and Father Scott. After working as a newspaper reporter for a number of years, she joined the faculty of the University of North Carolina at Chapel Hill in 1966. She taught creative writing there for 32 years. During her lifetime, she wrote 6 novels and 3 short story collections. Her novel, Souls Raised from the Dead, won the Southern Book Award in 1995. Her other works include The Gentle Insurrection, Tall Houses in Winter, The Scarlet Thread, The River to Pickle Beach, and The Sharp Teeth of Love. She won numerous awards including the N.C. Award for Literature, the John Dos Passos Prize, the American Academy of Arts and Letters Medal of Merit for her short stories, and the Sir Walter Raleigh Award for Fiction from the N.C. Literary and Historical Association, which she won three times. Her short story, The Ugliest Pilgrim, was made into an Academy Award-winning film and a musical that won the New York Drama Critics Circle Award in 1998. She died of lung cancer on April 21, 2012 at the age of 79.

Bibliographic information