Indiana University: Its History from 1820, when Founded, to 1890 : with Biographical Sketches of Its Presidents, Professors and Graduates : and a List of Its Students from 1820 to 1887 (Google eBook)

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Wm. B. Burford, 1890 - 472 pages
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Page 14 - It shall be the duty of the General assembly, as soon as circumstances will permit, to provide, by law, for a general system of education, ascending in a regular gradation, from township schools to a state university, wherein tuition shall be gratis, and equally open to all.
Page 74 - No portion of said fund, nor the interest thereon, shall be applied, directly or indirectly, under any pretense whatever, to the purchase, erection, preservation, or repair of any building or buildings.
Page 6 - I thank God, there are no free schools nor printing, and I hope we shall not have these hundred years. For learning has brought disobedience and heresy, and sects into the world, and printing has divulged them, and libels against the best government. God keep us from both"!
Page 25 - ... be recommended from time to time by the said corporation, they conforming to the will of any donor or donors in the application of any estate which may be given, devised, or bequeathed, for any particular object connected with the College. SEC.
Page 9 - That thirty-six sections, or one entire township, which shall be designated by the President of the United States, together with the one heretofore reserved for that purpose, shall be reserved for the use of a seminary of learning, and vested in the Legislature of the said State, to be appropriated solely to the use of such seminary by the said Legislature.
Page 13 - Legislature may direct. 2. The Legislature shall encourage, by all suitable means the promotion of intellectual, scientific, moral and agricultural improvement. The proceeds of all lands that have been or hereafter may be granted by the United States to this State for the support of schools...
Page 13 - Knowledge and learning, generally diffused through a community, being essential to the preservation of a free government ; and spreading the opportunities and advantages of education through the various parts of the country being highly conducive to promote this end ; it shall be the duty of the legislators and magistrates, in all future periods of this government, to cherish the interest of literature and the sciences, and all seminaries and public schools...
Page 8 - There shall be reserved the lot No. 16, of every township, for the maintenance of public schools, within the said township...
Page 8 - Ohio" confirmed the provision of 1785, and declared that "religion, morality and knowledge being necessary to good government and the happiness of mankind, schools and the means of education shall be forever encouraged.
Page 14 - Knowledge and Learning generally diffused throughout a community being essential to the preservation of a free government, it shall be the duty of the General Assembly to encourage, by all suitable means, moral, intellectual, scientific and agricultural improvement; and to provide by law for a general uniform system of common schools wherein tuition shall be without charge and equally open to all.

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