Soviet Natural Resources in the World Economy

Front Cover
Robert G. Jensen, Theodore Shabad, Arthur W. Wright
University of Chicago Press, Aug 1, 1983 - Nature - 700 pages
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Russia is a huge storehouse of natural resources, including oil, gas, and other energy sources, which she can trade with the rest of the world for advanced technology and wheat. In this book, leading experts evaluate the Soviet potential in major energy and industrial raw materials, giving special attention to implications for the world economy to the end of the twentieth century.

The authors examine the mineral and forest resources that the Soviet Union has developed and may yet develop to provide exports during the 1980s. They discuss the regional dimension of these resources, especially in Siberia and the Soviet Far East; individual mineral raw materials, such as petroleum, natural gas, timber, iron ore, manganese, and gold; and finally the role of raw materials in Soviet foreign trade.

The authors, representing the United States, Canada, and Great Britain, are primarily geographers, but they include economists, political scientists, and a geologist. Their work is based on primary sources (for most of these reports, current information is no longer being released to researchers) and on interviews with Soviet officials.
  

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Contents

development of Siberia
15
Siberia
16
MultiStage Evolutionary Development of a Siberian Territorial Production Complex
19
Subzones of Harsh Cold in Siberia
24
Temperature and Wind Chill
25
Wind Regions and Wind Chill in Siberia
26
Permafrost and Snow Cover in Siberia
30
Alas and Thermocirque Development
32
Resources of the BAM Zone and Its Contiguous Area
149
The Udokan Copper Province
157
Yakutian LNG Project
158
South Yakutian Coal and Iron Province
159
Irkutsk Amphitheater Oil and Gas
160
North Sakhalin Oil and Gas
161
The Soviet Hierarchy of Regions
171
Projected Territorial Production Complexes in the Far East Post1990
178

Mean Dates of Freezing of Streams in Autumn a and Mean Dates of the Spring Breakup b
33
Permafrost Deformation and Damage
37
Harshness and EngineeringGeographic Regions of Siberia
42
Earthquake Intensity Regions
43
Recent Faults and Volcanic Regions
44
Regions with High Potential for Flows and Slides in Siberia
46
Siberian Avalanche Regions and Tsunami Zones
47
Formation and Classification of Icings
48
A Model of Perpetual Disruption in a Periglacial Environment
52
Siberian Growth Centers
57
Environmental Constraints to Siberian Development
58
Interrelationships of Environmental Constraints and Human Activity in Siberia
60
EngineeringGeographic Regions
61
Icing Regions of Siberia
63
Siberian Technobiogeomes
65
197090
72
1961
73
198090
74
198090 79 5 Total Net Migration 196870
76
197079
77
197079
79
Soviet Decision Making in Regional Planning and Its Potential Impact on Siberian Resource Exports
124
Geographic Allocation of Investment Funds
126
The BaikalAmur Mainline and Its Implications for the Pacific Basin 1 The BaikalAmur Mainline
133
Freight Turnover in Ports
136
Qualitative Assessment of Incentives for Pacific Development
137
Pacific Siberia and the BAM Service Area
140
BAM Construction
143
Impact of BAM on Pacific Siberian Accessibility
145
Estimated Freight Turnover and Commodity Flows in the Soviet Far East a and Estimated Freight Turnover and Commodity
146
Flows in the Soviet Far East excluding West Siberian Oil Shipments b
147
Resource Reserves as a Function of Price and Technology
148
Editors Preface xvii by Richard L Edmonds
214
Territories Under Dispute Between the USSR
224
in a Global Context 3 Policy Problems and Potential
251
Soviet Resource Development by Theodore Shabad
275
by Robert G Jensen Chapter 13 Estimating Demand for Energy
296
History Technology
306
VolgaUrals Oil Output 194580 and 1985
342
The Regional Dimensions
384
Zones of Natural Gas Consumption in
394
Soviet Decision Making Chapter 17 Regional Dilemmas
411
The BaikalAmur Mainline Chapter 18 The Role of Imported Technology
442
Commodity Flows Resource Potential by Kathleen Braden
464
Modeling the Optimal Commodity Flow
486
Modeling the Optimal Commodity Flow
492
Output and Export
506
Output and Export
516
Output and Export
529
Output and Export
531
Nickel and Platinum in the Soviet Union
536
The Soviet GoldMining Industry
556
Resource Valuation and the Efficiency
597
The Changing Role of Raw Material Exports
623
Fuel Mix of Thermal Power Stations
631
Soviet Primary Product Exports to CMEA
639
The Share of Selected Primary Product
650
Time Trends for Soviet Primary Product
656
by Edward A Hewett
659
Energy Consumption
662
in the Soviet Union 536 by Lawrence J Brainard
679
Soviet Natural Resource Exports
693
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About the author (1983)

Robert G. Jensen is professor and chairman of the Geography Department at Syracuse University. Theodore Shabad is lecturer in the Department of Geography at Columbia University and editor of the journal Soviet Geography. Arthur W. Wright is professor and chairman of the Department of Economics at the University of Connecticut.

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