A balcony in the forest

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Harvill Press, 1996 - Fiction - 213 pages
11 Reviews
In the Ardennes Forest on the Begian border the French guns point north-east, awaiting the German onslaught. One reinforced concrete blockhouse in the heart of the forest is manned, this winter of 1939/40, by Lieutenant Grange with three men, who live in a chalet built over it. cut off from the rest of the world, their senses heightened to capture the sounds and smells of the forest, the men create their own security as autumn turns to winter. Later, though, when winter turns to spring, when the sap rises and the panzer divisions attack, Lieutenant Grange meets the fate he has never believed he would escape. But if this is a story of soldiers, it is not about fighting. It is about solitude, about watching and waiting - and about love, the young lieutenant's devotion to Mona, the child-widow discovered like a sprite in the forest one rainy night, who, in this surreal period of suspence, becomes his lover.

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Review: A Balcony in the Forest

User Review  - Lee - Goodreads

I love when this site leads to masterpieces previously unknown to me. Stoner, most memorably, and a few others. Now this one. Sumptuous prose, never over the top as in The Opposing Shore, steady ... Read full review

Review: A Balcony in the Forest

User Review  - Mark Broadhead - Goodreads

Reminded me of Sartre's trilogy, of course, particularly 'Iron in the Soul'. Less political than Sartre, but Gracq is more poetic. It reads so well that the pages fly by. My only complaint is that the ... Read full review

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Contents

Section 1
8
Section 2
12
Section 3
15
Copyright

17 other sections not shown

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About the author (1996)

Richard Howard was born in Cleveland, Ohio on October 13, 1929. He received a B.A. from Columbia University in 1951 and studied at the Sorbonne as a Fellow of the French Government in 1952-1953. He briefly worked as a lexicographer, but soon turned his attention to poetry and poetic criticism. His works include Trappings: New Poems; Like Most Revelations: New Poems; Selected Poems; No Traveler; Findings; Alone with America; and Quantities. He won the Pulitzer Prize for poetry in 1969 for Untitled Subjects. He is also a translator and published more than 150 translations from the French. He received the PEN Translation Prize in 1976 for his translation of E. M. Cioran's A Short History of Decay and the American Book Award for his 1983 translation of Baudelaire's Les Fleurs du Mal. In 1982, he was named a Chevalier of L'Ordre National du Mérite by the government of France. He teaches in the Writing Division of the School of the Arts, Columbia University.

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