The Edinburgh Review: Or Critical Journal, Volume 26 (Google eBook)

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A. Constable, 1816
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Page 383 - The narrative of Robert Adams, a sailor, who was wrecked on the western coast of Africa in the year 1810, was detained three years in slavery by the Arabs of the great Desert, and resided several months in the city of Tombuctoo.
Page 104 - But even more rapidly than the earliest blossoms of youth and beauty decay, it hurries on from the first timidly-bold declaration of love and modest return to the most unlimited passion, to an irrevocable union : then, amidst alternating storms of rapture and despair, to the death of the two lovers, who still appear enviable as their love survives them, and as by their death they have obtained a triumph over every separating power. The sweetest and the bitterest, love and hatred, festivity and dark...
Page 486 - twas a temple, as its sculpture told, Built to the Nymphs that haunted there of old ; For o'er the door was carved a sacrifice By girls and shepherds brought, with reverend eyes, Of sylvan drinks and foods, simple and sweet, And goats with struggling horns and planted feet...
Page 254 - An Account of the Systems of Husbandry adopted in the more improved districts of Scotland; with some observations on the improvements of which they are susceptible.
Page 101 - And yet Johnson has objected to Shakespear, that his pathos is not always natural and free from affectation. There are, it is true, passages, though, comparatively speaking, very few, where his poetry exceeds the bounds of true dialogue, where a too soaring imagination, a too luxuriant wit, rendered the complete dramatic forgetfulness of himself impossible. With this exception, the censure originates only in a fanciless way of thinking, to which everything appears unnatural that does not suit its...
Page 264 - Continent renders very unlikely; and because it was well worth while to incur a loss upon the first exportation, in order, by the glut, to stifle in the cradle those rising manufactures in the United States, which the war had forced into existence, contrary to the natural course of things...
Page 60 - Crimes, that then he or they shall from thenceforth be disabled to sue, prosecute, plead or use any Action or Information in any Court of Law or Equity, or to be Guardian of any Child, or Executor or Administrator of any Person, or capable of any Legacy or Deed of Gift...
Page 54 - THEY also are to be had accursed that presume to say, That every man shall be saved by the Law or Sect which he professeth, so that he be diligent to frame his life according to that Law, and the light of Nature. For Holy Scripture doth set out unto us only the Name of Jesus Christ, whereby men must be saved.
Page 440 - The Dominion of the Kandyan Provinces is vested in the Sovereign of the British Empire, and to be exercised through the Governors or...
Page 102 - The constant reference to a petty and puny race must cripple the boldness of the poet. Fortunately for his art, Shakspeare lived in an age extremely susceptible of noble and tender impressions, but which had still enough of the firmness inherited from a vigorous olden time, not to shrink back with dismay from every strong and violent picture. We have lived to see tragedies of which the catastrophe consists in the swoon of an enamoured princess. If Shakspeare falls occasionally into the opposite extreme,...

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