Broca's Brain: Reflections on the Romance of Science

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Ballantine Books, 1980 - Science - 398 pages
12 Reviews
Carl Sagan, writer and scientist, returns from the frontier to tell us about how the world works. In his delightfully down-to-earth style, he explores and explains a mind-boggling future of intelligent robots, extraterrestrial life and its consquences, and other provocative, fascinating quandries of the future that we want to see today.
  

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Review: Broca's Brain: Reflections on the Romance of Science

User Review  - Ana - Goodreads

i'm amazed that i was able to understand three quarters of this book with little or no help at all from any outside source. there were times when i had to use the dictionary or find someone on the ... Read full review

Review: Broca's Brain: Reflections on the Romance of Science

User Review  - Sagar Vibhute - Goodreads

Carl Sagan is science's poet. I might read Broca's Brain a few times more just to immerse into his almost idyllic prose, not to mention that Carl Sagan has, in a masterful style, tackled a very ... Read full review

Contents

Brocas Brain
3
Can We Know the Universe? Reflections on s Grain of Salt
15
That World Which Beckons Like a Liberation
22
In Praise of Science and Technology
38
Sense and Nonsense at the Edge of Science
51
White Dwarfs and Little Green Men
77
Venus and Dr Velikovsky
95
Norman Bloom Messenger of God
151
The Golden Age of Planetary Exploration
240
Will You Walk a Little Faster?
255
Via Cherry Tree to Mars
262
Experiments in Space
269
In Defense of Robots
280
The Past and Future of American Astronomy
293
The Quest for Extraterrestrial Intelligence
314
ULTIMATE QUESTIONS
328

Science FictionA Personal View
162
OUR NEIGBORHOOD IN SPACE 10 The Suns Family
175
A Planet Named George
188
Life in the Solar System
206
Titan the Enigmatic Moon of Saturn
214
The Climates of Planets
222
Kalliope and the Kaaba
233
A Sunday Sermon
329
Gott and the Turtles
342
The Amniotic Universe
353
References
369
Index
383
Copyright

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About the author (1980)

A respected planetary scientist best known outside the field for his popularizations of astronomy, Carl Sagan was born in New York City on November 9, 1934. He attended the University of Chicago, where he received a B.A. in 1954, a B.S. in 1955, and a M.S. in 1956 in physics as well as a Ph.D. in 1960 in astronomy and astrophysics. He has several early scholarly achievements including the experimental demonstration of the synthesis of the energy-carrying molecule ATP (adenosine triphosphate) in primitive-earth experiments. Another was the proposal that the greenhouse effect explained the high temperature of the surface of Venus. He was also one of the driving forces behind the mission of the U.S. satellite Viking to the surface of Mars. He was part of a team that investigated the effects of nuclear war on the earth's climate - the "nuclear winter" scenario. Sagan's role in developing the "Cosmos" series, one of the most successful series of any kind to be broadcast on the Public Broadcasting System, and his book The Dragons of Eden (1977) won the Pulitzer Prize in 1978. He also wrote the novel Contact, which was made into a movie starring Jodie Foster. He died from pneumonia on December 20, 1996.

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