Neighborly Adversaries: Readings in U.S.-Latin American Relations

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Michael J. LaRosa, Frank O. Mora
Rowman & Littlefield, 2007 - Political Science - 371 pages
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Providing a balanced and interdisciplinary interpretation, this comprehensive reader traces the troubled U.S.–Latin American relationship from the beginning of the nineteenth century to the post 9/11 period. Thoroughly revised and updated, the second edition includes original essays on critical issues such as immigration and the environment. In addition, a new section helps students understand the most important themes and topics that unify and divide the United States and Latin American nations today. The readings are framed by the editors' opening chapter on the history of the relationship, part introductions, and abstracts for each selection. Methodologically interdisciplinary, yet comparative and historical in organization and structure, this collection will benefit students and specialists of Latin America's complex historical, social, and political relationship with its northern neighbor.
  

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Contents

III
17
IV
19
V
27
VI
35
VII
51
VIII
55
IX
65
X
67
XXII
159
XXIII
175
XXIV
179
XXV
193
XXVI
205
XXVII
219
XXVIII
235
XXIX
239

XI
75
XII
81
XIII
83
XIV
93
XV
97
XVI
101
XVII
109
XVIII
113
XIX
123
XX
135
XXI
149
XXX
249
XXXI
263
XXXII
275
XXXIII
287
XXXIV
303
XXXV
319
XXXVI
329
XXXVII
339
XXXVIII
351
XXXIX
353
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About the author (2007)

Michael LaRosa is associate professor of history at Rhodes College. Frank O. Mora, formerly professor of national security strategy at the National War College, National Defense University, is deputy assistant secretary of defense—western hemisphere.

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