The Lord of the rings and philosophy: one book to rule them all

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Open Court, Aug 4, 2003 - Literary Criticism - 240 pages
22 Reviews
Can power be wielded for good, or must it always corrupt? Does technology destroy the truly human? Is beer essential to the good life? The Lord of the Rings raises many such searching questions, and this book attempts some answers. Divided into five sections concerned with power and the Ring, the quest for happiness, good and evil in Middle-earth, time and mortality, and the relevance of fairy tales, The Lord of the Rings and Philosophy mines Tolkienís fantasy worlds for wisdom in areas including the menace of technology, addiction and fetishism, the vitality of tradition, the environmental implications of Tolkien's thought, Middle-earth's relationship to Buddhism and Taoism, and more.

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Review: The Lord of the Rings and Philosophy: One Book to Rule Them All (Popular Culture and Philosophy #5)

User Review  - Jackie - Goodreads

Wasn't impressed at all. Read full review

Review: The Lord of the Rings and Philosophy: One Book to Rule Them All (Popular Culture and Philosophy #5)

User Review  - Titus Hjelm - Goodreads

I could imagine some of the chapters working well as pop culture intros to (mostly) moral philosophy. The contributions are uneven, however, and some (LOTR and Buddhism/Taoism?) far fethched, honestly ... Read full review

Contents

The Rings of Tolkien and Plato Lessons in Power Choice and Morality
5
The Cracks of Doom The Threat of Emerging Technologies and Tolkiens Rings of Power
21
My Precious Tolkiens Fetishized Rin
33
Copyright

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About the author (2003)

Gregory Bassham is Director of the Center for Ethics and Public Life and Chair of the Philosophy Department at King's College (Pa.). He is the co-editor of The Lord of the Rings and Philosophy (Open Court, 2003), author of Original Intent and the Constitution: A Philosophical Study (Rowman & Littlefield, 1992), and co-editor of Powerweb: Critical Thinking (McGraw-Hill, 2003-2004). William Irwin is Associate Professor of Philosophy at King's College and Series Editor of Open Court's Popular Culture and Philosophy. Co-editor of The Simpsons and Philosophy (Open Court, 2001), his most recent book, The Matrix and Philosophy, was a New York Times Bestseller. Henry Nardone is Professor of Philosophy at King's College. His publications include scholarly articles on critical thinking and aesthetics. James M. Wallace is Professor of English at King's College. Author of Parallel Lives: A Novel Way to Learn Thinking and Writing (1999), Jim's essay, "A (Karl Not Groucho) Marxist in Springfield," appeared in The Simpsons and Philosophy (Open Court, 2001).

Eric Bronson heads the philosophy and history departments at Berkeley College in New York City. He coedited The Lord of the Rings and Philosophy and contributed to The Simpsons and Philosophy and Seinfeld and Philosophy. He lives in new York City.