The Scotch-Irish: Or, The Scot in North Britain, North Ireland, and North America, Volume 1 (Google eBook)

Front Cover
G.P. Putnam's Sons, 1902 - Scotch-Irish
0 Reviews
  

What people are saying - Write a review

We haven't found any reviews in the usual places.

Contents

Common terms and phrases

Popular passages

Page 41 - That the raising or keeping a standing army within the kingdom in time of peace, unless it be with consent of parliament, is against law.
Page 38 - When the legislative and executive powers are united in the same person, or in the same body of magistrates, there can be no liberty ; because apprehensions may arise, lest the same monarch or senate should enact tyrannical laws, to execute them in a tyrannical manner.
Page 72 - ... it is not the cause of a poor printer, nor of New York alone, which you are now trying. No! It may in its consequence affect every freeman that lives under a British government on the main of America! It is the best cause. It is the cause of liberty...
Page 437 - If you aim at a Scottish Presbytery, it agreeth as well with monarchy as God and the devil. Then Jack, and Tom, and Will, and Dick, shall meet, and at their pleasure censure me and my council, and all our proceedings ; then Will shall stand up and say, It must be thus ; then Dick shall reply, Nay, marry, but we will have it thus.
Page 335 - They greatly oppressed the wretched people by making them work at these castles, and when the castles were finished they filled them with devils and evil men. Then they took those whom they suspected to have any goods, by night and by day, seizing both men and women, and they put them in prison for their gold and silver and tortured them with pains unspeakable ; for never were any martyrs tortured as these were.
Page 206 - The barbarians drive us to the sea ; the sea throws us back on the barbarians : thus two modes of death await us, we are either slain or drowned.
Page 56 - Otis was a flame of fire. With a promptitude of classical allusions, a depth of research, a rapid summary of historical events and dates, a profusion of legal authorities, a prophetic glance of his eye into futurity, and a torrent of impetuous eloquence, he hurried away everything before him. American independence was then and there born ; the seeds of patriots and heroes were then and there sown, to defend the vigorous youth, the non sine diis animosus infant.
Page 39 - States, except in cases of impeachment; to recommend to the consideration of Congress such measures as he shall judge necessary and expedient...
Page 41 - States,' and have consequently become parts of the Constitution. To this process the country is indebted for the clause prohibiting Congress from passing any law respecting an establishment of religion, or abridging the freedom of speech or of the press, or of the right of petition.
Page 41 - That excessive bail ought not to be required, nor excessive fines imposed, nor cruel and unusual punishments inflicted: 10.

Bibliographic information