American Anthropologist (Google eBook)

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American Anthropological Association of Washington, 1914 - Anthropology
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Page 542 - Mound-builders (1881); Races and Peoples (1890); and The American Race (1891). Among his special articles, those deserving more particular notice, are that on "Anthropology, as a Science and as a Branch of University Education in the United States...
Page 529 - Observations upon the cranial forms of the American aborigines, based upon specimens contained in the collection of the Academy of Natural Sciences of Phila.
Page 64 - He paid the carver very well, however, both in slaves and in goods. Now the chief dressed this image in his wife's clothes and her marten-skin robe. He felt that his wife had come back to him and treated the image just like her. One day, while he sat mourning very close to the image, he felt it move. His wife had also been very fond of him. At first he thought that the movement was only his imagination, yet he examined it every day, for he thought that at some time it would come to life. When he...
Page 458 - North Pacific Coast Area. Ranging northward from California' to the Alaskan peninsula we have an ethnic coast belt, known as the North Pacific Coast area. This culture is rather complex and presents highly individualized tribal variations; but can be consistently treated under three subdivisions : (a) the northern group, Tlingit, Haida, and Tsimshian ; (b) the central group, the Kwakiutl tribes and the Bellacoola; and (c) the southern group, the Coast Salish, the Nootka, the Chinook, Kalapooian,...
Page 626 - Winnebago cult seems to have at once placed the new plant in the category of medicinal herbs, and accordingly to have associated with it the traditional shamanistic ideas. The organization of the new society automatically conformed to the Winnebago norm. The origin narrative developed by one of the converts "assumed all the characteristics of a Winnebago fasting experience and ritualistic myth, similar to those connected with the founders of the old Winnebago cult societies. In this totality, the...
Page 520 - A glass tube hermetically sealed at one end, was cut off so as to hold exactly five cubic inches of water by weight, at 60 Fahrenheit. A float of light wood, well varnished, two and a quarter inches in diameter, with a slender rod of the same material fixed in its centre, was dropped into the tin cylinder; then five cubic inches of water, measured in the glass tube, were poured into the cylinder, and the point at which the rod on the float stood above the top of the cylinder, was marked with the...
Page 453 - The chief traits of this culture are the dependence upon the buffalo and the very limited use of roots and berries; absence of fishing; lack of agriculture; the tipi as a. movable dwelling; transportation by land only with the dog and the travois (in historic times with the horse); want of basketry and pottery; no true weaving; clothing of buffalo and deerskins...
Page 519 - He has also bestowed particular attention on the crania from the mounds of this country, which have been compared with similar relics, derived both from ancient and modern tribes, " in order to examine by the evidence of osteological facts, whether the American aborigines, of all epochs, have belonged to one race, or to a plurality of races.
Page 20 - They went into winter quarters in some place where water, wood and unburnt grass in abundance for the horses were to be had. Here they remained till forage became scarce, when another place was sought. If grass could not be found in sufficient quantity, they cut cotton-wood trees, and subsisted the horses on the bark and tender twigs. The return to the villages did not take place till young grass was started in the spring.
Page 118 - Hebrew, taken together also contribute less than 5 per cent, leaving to all the remaining mother tongues another 5 per cent, or less, of the total. Of the total foreign white stock of the United States, 32,243,382, there are 8,817,271 persons who are of German stock when counted according to mother tongue. Of the foreign-born white element of the United States, 25.2 per cent reported English (including...

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