Indian Merchants and Eurasian Trade, 1600-1750

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Cambridge University Press, Aug 15, 2002 - Business & Economics - 180 pages
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This is a study of the activities and economic significance of the Indian merchant communities that traded in Iran, Central Asia and Russia in the seventeenth and eighteenth centuries, and their role within the hegemonic trade diaspora of the period. The author has made use of Russian material, hitherto largely ignored, to highlight the importance of these mercantile communities, and to challenge the conventional view of world economic history in the early modern era. The book not only demonstrates the vitality of Indian mercantile capitalism at the time, but also offers a unique insight into the social characteristics of an expatriate community in the Volga-Caspian port of Astrakhan.
  

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Contents

An Indian world economy
1
The Eurasian context
7
India Iran and Turan in 1600
14
The economies
15
Commerce and the state
30
IntraAsian trade
42
The Indian diaspora in Iran and Turan
45
Trade routes
46
The New Trade Regulations
95
Merchants and the state
98
The Indian diaspora in the Volga basin
101
Patterns of Indian commerce
108
The Indian firm in Astrakhan
112
Companies and capital
121
Peddlers merchants and moneylenders
126
Imperial collapse mercantilism and the Mughul diaspora
128

Multan and the Multanis
55
Mediatory trade
64
The Multanis of Isfahan
66
Technology transfers
75
IndoRussian commerce in the early modern era
78
The Indian guesthouse in Astrakhan
86
Borzois and gyrfalcons
90
Multanis and Multan
129
Indian entrepreneurs and Eurasian trade
133
Appendix
139
Bibliography
142
Index
158
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