History of the Sixth Regiment Indiana Volunteer Infantry: Of Both the Three Months' and Three Years' Services... (Google eBook)

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W. B. Burford, printer and binder, 1891 - United States - 423 pages
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Page 2 - Abraham Lincoln, President of the United States, in virtue of the power in me vested by the Constitution and the laws, have thought fit to call forth...
Page 114 - ... in three lines of battle, the first and second extending from Owl creek on the left, to Lick creek on the right, a distance of about three miles, supported by the third and the reserve.
Page 114 - The searching bullets found other poor unfortunates in their tents, and there, all unheeding now, they still slumbered, while the unseen foe rushed on. Others fell, as they were disentangling themselves from the flaps that formed the doors to their tents; others as they were buckling on their accoutrements ; a...
Page 114 - ... of the enemy. Into the just-aroused camps thronged the rebel regiments, firing sharp volleys as they came, and springing toward our laggards with the bayonet. Some were shot down as they were running, without weapons, hatless, coatless, toward the river. The searching bullets found other poor unfortunates in their tents, and there all unheeding now, they still slumbered, while the unseen foe rushed on. Others fell, as...
Page 208 - Major-General Crittenden to advance to Lannon's Stand, six miles east of Beech Grove, and open communications with General Thomas. "General Thomas to attack the rebels on the flank of his advance position at the forks of the road, and drive the rebels toward Fairfield. " General McCook to feign and advance, as if in force, on the Wartrace road by the Liberty Gap passes. "General Stanley, with his cavalry, to occupy their attention at Forstorville, and General Granger to support him with his infantry...
Page 77 - The foe they met they vanquished. They scattered the traitors from their secure entrenchments in the gorges of Laurel Hill, stripped of their munitions of war, to flee before the vengeance of patriots. Soldiers! you have now returned to the friends whose prayers went with you to the field of strife. They welcome you with pride and exultation. Your State and country acknowledge the value of your labors. May your future career be as your past has been, honorable to yourselves and serviceable to your...
Page 9 - I therefore recommend that one million of dollars be appropriated for the purchase of arms and munitions of war, and for the organization of such portion of the Militia as may be deemed necessary for the emergency. That a militia system be devised and enacted looking chiefly to volunteers, which shall insure the greatest protection to the State, and unity and efficiency of the force to be employed. That a law be enacted defining and punishing treason against the State. That a law be enacted suspending...
Page 9 - ... the Executive Departments of the Federal Government and of the State during the war, made the people more willing to submit to this larger centralization in the State administration. In the very first year of the war the authorities of counties, cities and towns were given power to levy a tax, and to appropriate money for the protection and maintenance of the families of volunteers in the armies of the United States and of the State of Indiana.1 There was no central supervision over the administration...
Page 122 - Rebels swept up to the batteries, around them, and on down after our retreating column. But the two brigades, like those of Nelson to their left, took a fresh position, faced the foe, and held their ground. Mendenhall's and Bartlett's Batteries now began shelling the infantry that alone opposed them. Before abandoning the guns so briefly held, they had spiked them with mud, and the novel expedient was perfectly successful.
Page 288 - ... be narrated on history's page, this gallant charge of the brave men of Wood's and Sheridan's divisions, with those of Baird and Johnson on their left and right, will always be the prominent feature of the engagement as told in the coming years, and will be the last to lose its glory and renown. No wonder that General Grant failed to appreciate this movement at the time, not understanding the troops who had it in charge. When he found these commands ascending the ridge to capture it when he ordered...

References from web pages

WILLIAM S. (WILLIAM STANLEY) MEAD COLLECTION, 1846-1934
Briant, Charles C. History of the Sixth Regiment Indiana Volunteer Infantry of Both the Three Months’ and Three Years’ Services. Indianapolis: wb Burford ...
www.indianahistory.org/ Library/ manuscripts/ collection_guides/ m0841.html

Civil War Books
Facsimile Reprints of Unit Histories, Participant Accounts, Rosters
wardhousebooks.com/ Indiana.html

James River Publications - Indiana Regiments - mosocco.com/jreb ...
INDIANA INFANTRY REGIMENTS. Indiana at Vicksburg," by Henry C. Adams. Originally published in 1911, at Indianapolis, Indiana, this book may prove hard to ...
www.mosocco.com/ indiana.html

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