Old and New Paris: Its History, Its People, and Its Places ... (Google eBook)

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Cassell and Company, 1894 - Paris (France)
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Page 275 - The wondering neighbours ran, And swore the dog had lost his wits, To bite so good a man. The wound it seemed both sore and sad, To every Christian eye : And while they- swore the dog was mad, They swore the man would die. But soon a wonder came to light, That showed the rogues they lied ; The man recovered of the bite, The dog it was that died.
Page 124 - I represent before you a principle, a cause, and a defeat. The principle is the sovereignty of the people ; the cause is that of the Empire ; the defeat is that of Waterloo. The principle — you have recognised it ; the cause — you have served in it ; the defeat — you would revenge it. No, then, there is no dis-accord between you and me...
Page 299 - Elizabeth, giving her, at full length, my direction, in case she had any silk ball to send to me. This letter was directed to her house, and signed Essex ; but no sooner was it put into the post-office, when I was informed on one side that the very person to whom I wrote had been arrested a few days after I had left Paris, for favouring a clandestine correspondence of one of...
Page 94 - Now pass onward as thou wert wont, and Douglas will follow thee or die ! ''^ The action and the sentiment were heroic ; and they were the last words and deed of a heroic life, for Douglas fell, overpowered by his enemies; and three of his knights...
Page 116 - The record shows that the defendant was asked if he had anything to say why sentence should not be passed upon him.
Page 302 - ... Eighteenth. The Abbe Edgeworth went, with his Majesty's permission, to attend them, to give them all the comforts which humanity could procure, and all the consolations which religion could bestow. A contagious fever raged amongst these prisoners, but the venerable Abbe persevered in his visits, nor would he abandon those who had no earthly hope but in him. Day and night he continued his attendance, assisted by his faithful servant, Bousset, who emulated the virtues of his master. The Abbe caught...
Page 302 - On the 17th of May, 1807, he was confined to that bed from which he never afterwards rose. When the daughter of Louis the Sixteenth heard that the Abbé Edgeworth was taken ill, she declared that she would go immediately and see this friend of her family. All her attendants represented to her the danger of infection, and used every argument and entreaty to prevail upon her not to attempt what was so hazardous; but to use the strong expression of a lady who knew the fact, " No one could keep her "from...
Page 103 - Officers, under-officers, and soldiers, the cause of the Bourbons is lost for ever. The dynasty adopted by the French nation is about to re-ascend the throne. To the Emperor Napoleon, our sovereign, alone belongs the right of reigning for our dear country. Let the Bourbon nobility make up its mind to leave the country once more, or consent to live in the midst of us. What in either case does it matter ? The sacred cause of liberty and independence will suffer no more from their fatal hands. They...
Page 235 - Orleans. The King seemed to be well acquainted with his intrigues, and with the horrid part he had taken at the Convention ; but he spoke of him without any bitterness, and with pity rather than with anger. ' What have I done to my cousin...
Page 282 - Monsieur, tell those who sent you that we are here by the will of the People, and that nothing but the force of bayonets...

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