Colored people: a memoir

Front Cover
Knopf, May 10, 1994 - Biography & Autobiography - 216 pages
29 Reviews
From an American Book Award-winning author comes a pungent and poignant masterpiece of recollection that ushers readers into a now-vanished "colored" world and extends and deepens our sense of African-American history, even as it entrances us with its bravura storytelling. From the Trade Paperback edition.

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Review: Colored People

User Review  - Mtutuzeli Nyoka - Goodreads

Henry Louis Gates Jr. is a Professor of African and African-American Studies at Harvard University and Director of the WEB Du Bois Institute for African and African American Research. His book ... Read full review

Review: Colored People

User Review  - Joanna - Goodreads

This is how memoir is DONE. Thoroughly engaging from beginning to end, Gates tells his town, family, and personal history-from growing up in a fully segregated South, through a painful series of ... Read full review

Contents

Colored People
3
Prime Time
17
Wet Dogs White People
29
Copyright

17 other sections not shown

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About the author (1994)

Henry Louis Gates was born on September 16, 1950, in Keyser, West Virginia. A respected scholar in African American Studies, Gates graduated from Yale and Cambridge universities. A visit to Africa during the 1970s further developed his interest in African American literature and culture and helped him expand his theories. He is responsible for rediscovering and reviving many writings by black authors, and his goal is to restore the role of black literature in its proper context. He has written numerous historical books including Colored People: A Memoir, A Chronology of African-American History, and The Future of the Race. Gates also has his critics; his appearance at the obscenity trial of the rap group 2 Live Crew was seen as flagrantly self-advancing, and he has been accused of being overly Afrocentric. Nevertheless, his reputation as a scholar is well-deserved. Not only has he taught at Harvard, Yale, Duke, and Cornell, but he has been awarded many honors, including the highly coveted MacArthur Foundation "genius grant.