Given: New Poems

Front Cover
Shoemaker & Hoard, 2006 - Poetry - 152 pages
20 Reviews
For five decades Wendell Berry has been a poet of great clarity and purpose. He is an award-winning writer whose imagination is grounded by the pastures of his chosen place and the rooms and porches of his family's home. InGiven— his first collection of new poems in ten years now in paperback — the work is as rich and varied as ever before. With his unmistakable voice as the constant, he dexterously maneuvers through a variety of forms and themes — political cautions, love poems, a play in verse, and a long series of “Sabbath Poems” that resulted from Berry's recent Sunday morning walks of meditation and observation.

Berry's work is one of devotion to family and community, to the earth and her creatures, to the memories of the past, and the hope of the future. His writing stands alongside the work of William Carlos Williams and Robert Frost as a rigorous American testament.

What people are saying - Write a review

User ratings

5 stars
9
4 stars
8
3 stars
1
2 stars
2
1 star
0

Review: Given

User Review  - Kirk - Goodreads

I think Berry is underrated as a poet. Glad his stuff like Given is out there for all to enjoy. Read full review

Review: Given

User Review  - Sara - Goodreads

Oh, Wendell Berry. You're poems are little gems. Read full review

About the author (2006)

Wendell Berry The prolific poet, novelist, and essayist Wendell Berry is a fifth-generation native of north central Kentucky. Berry taught at Stanford University; traveled to Italy and France on a Guggenheim Fellowship; and taught at New York University and the University of Kentucky, Lexington, before moving to Henry County. Berry owns and operates Lanes Landing Farm, a small, hilly piece of property on the Kentucky River. He embraced full-time farming as a career, using horses and organic methods to tend the land. Harmony with nature in general, and the farming tradition in particular, is a central theme of Berry's diverse work. As a poet, Berry gained popularity within the literary community. Collected Poems, 1957-1982, was particularly well-received. Novels and short stories set in Port William, a fictional town paralleling his real-life home town of Port Royal further established his literary reputation. The Memory of Old Jack, Berry's third novel, received Chicago's Friends of American Writers Award for 1975. Berry reached his broadest audience and attained his greatest popular acclaim through his essays. The Unsettling of America: Culture and Agriculture is a springboard for contemporary environmental concerns. In his life as well as his art, Berry has advocated a responsible, contextual relationship with individuals in a local, agrarian economy.

Bibliographic information