The Fighting Governor: A Chronicle of Frontenac (Google eBook)

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Glasgow, Brook, 1915 - Canada - 167 pages
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Page 100 - I, and the warriors here present, are come to assure you that the Senecas, Cayugas, Onondagas, Oneidas and Mohawks are yet alive. I thank you in their name, for bringing back into their country the calumet which your predecessor received from their hands. It was happy for you that you left under ground that murdering hatchet that has been so often dyed in the blood of the French.
Page 126 - Majesties' subjects of New England, without provocation on their part, hath put them under the necessity of this expedition for their own security and satisfaction. And although the cruelties and barbarities used against them by the French and Indians might, upon the present opportunity, prompt unto a severe revenge...
Page 127 - Majesties' service and the subjects' security. Which, if you refuse forthwith to do, I am come provided, and am resolved, by the help of God, in whom I trust, by force of arms to revenge all wrongs and injuries offered, and bring you under subjection to the Crown of England, and, when too late, make you wish you had accepted of the favour tendered. "Your answer positive in an hour returned by your own trumpet, with the return of mine, is required upon the peril that will ensue.
Page 126 - King's and other stores, unimbezzled, with a seasonable deliver}' of all captives; together with a surrender of all your persons and estates to my dispose: upon the doing whereof, you may expect mercy from me, as a Christian, according to what shall be found for their Majesties' service and the subjects
Page 100 - I honour you, and all the warriors that accompany me do the same. Your interpreter has made an end of his discourse, and now I come to begin mine. My voice glides to your ear. Pray listen to my words.
Page 120 - To the New England of old he was the abhorred chief of Popish malignants and murdering savages. The New England of to-day will be more just to the brave defender of his country and his faith. In May, 1660, a party of French Algonquins captured a Wolf, or Mohegan, Indian, naturalized among the Iroquois, brought him to Quebec, and burned him there with their usual atrocity of torture. A modern Catholic writer says that the Jesuits could not save him; but this is not so. Their influence over...
Page 100 - I must tell you, Onnontio, I am not asleep ; my eyes are open, and the sun that vouchsafes the light gives me a clear view of a great captain at the head of a troop of soldiers who speaks as if he were asleep. He pretends that he does not approach to this lake with any other view than to smoke with the...
Page 101 - have a power to go where we please, to conduct ' who we will to the places we resort to, and to buy ' and sell where we think fit. If your Allies are...
Page 100 - This certainly was your thought ; and it could be nothing else but the curiosity of seeing a burnt or drowned country that moved you to undertake a journey hither. But now you have an opportunity of being undeceived, for I and my warlike retinue come to assure you that the Senecas, Cayugas, Onondagas, Oneidas and Mohawks are not yet destroyed.
Page 101 - Mohawks say, that when they buried the hatchet at Cataracuoy, in the presence of your predecessor, in the very centre of the fort, and planted the tree of peace in the same place, it was then agreed, that the fort should be used as a place of rendezvous for merchants, and not as a refuge for soldiers.

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