Annual Report (Google eBook)

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Printed at the Republican office, 1879 - Education
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Page 169 - Every lesson should be given in such a way as to draw out the perceptive powers of the pupil by leading him to reflect on what he sees, or to analyze the object before him. It is, at first thought, strange although it is true that powers of observation are to be strengthened only by teaching the pupil to think upon what he sees. The process is one of division (analysis) and classification, and, secondly, of tracing causal relations...
Page 171 - ... something adapted to the capacity of your pupils; secondly, drawing out in a conversational manner the experience and information which your scholars already possess on the subject; thirdly, exhibiting the visible objects which you or the pupils have brought to illustrate the lesson, and requiring the pupils to notice and name the properties, qualities, parts, and attributes; fourthly, never omitting to show by a synopsis on the black-board what has been discussed in the lesson, its classification,...
Page 168 - In the fourth, fifth, and sixth years these subjects of Natural Science are all taken up again in a second course. and much more scientifically developed : a) Botany, its method and practical application ; b) Zoology and Human Physiology; c) motion and force in masses, in particles, and as applied in the mechanical powers ; d) Astronomy (forming a transition to the...
Page 161 - AMERICAN ATLAS, Illustrating the Physical and Political Geography of the United States of America, the British Provinces, Mexico, Central America, the West Indies, and South America ; constructed from official surveys and other authentic materials. The "American Atlas...
Page 167 - A selection of topics from a comparatively fall enumeration of them is best left to the individual teacher. 2) The exact number of topics that can be profitably discussed by teachers will vary with their capacities ; moreover, it will vary from year to year as teachers become familiar with the course ; hence it is necessary to have a variety, and to have topics enough ^ for the most rapid classes. 3) It is, moreover, important to keep...
Page 168 - It will be observed that in the seven years' course there is a spiral movement, or recurrence of the same topics: (1) The subjects of Natural Science, (a) the plant, (b) the animal, (c) the physical elements and mechanical powers constitute a primary course of three years ; so that even those who receive the minimum of school education shall acquire some insight into the elements and instrumentalities which play so important a part in the industrial age in which they live. (2) In the fourth...
Page 167 - The teacher must not consider herself required to go over all the topics in any given quarter. She must not attempt to do any more than she can do in a proper manner. If it happens that only the first two or three topics are all that can be dealt with profitably, the teacher must not allow herself to undertake any more. 2. In case the teacher finds that the topics of any given quarter are not arranged in such an order that she can take them up to the best advantage, she is at liberty to change that...
Page 169 - ... class. All must be marked and written down in the form of a synopsis. The blackboard is the most valuable appliance in oral lessons : on it should be written the technical words discussed, the classification of the knowledge brought out in the recitation, and, whenever possible, illustrative drawings, b) Pains should be taken to select passages from the reference books, or from other books illustrative of the subject under discussion, to be read to the class with explanation and conversation,...
Page 169 - But more stress should be laid on a direct appeal to their experience, encouraging them to describe what they have seen and heard, and arousing habits of reflection, and enabling the pupil to acquire a good command of language...
Page 174 - Cohesion (glue, paste, mortar, cement, etc.) ; 3. Capillary attraction (lamp-wick, sap, sponge, sugar, etc.) ; 4. Mechanical powers (lever, pulley, inclined plane, wedge and screw friction). Second quarter. Physics continued : 5. Heat (sun, combustion, friction, effect on bodies, steam, thermometer, conduction, clothing, cooking, etc.) ; 6. Light (sources, reflection, looking-glass, refraction, spectacles, microscope, prism, telescope, effect on growing bodies, photograph) ; 7. Electricity (lightning,...

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