An appeal in favor of that class of Americans called Africans (Google eBook)

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J. S. Taylor, 1836 - Social Science - 216 pages
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An Appeal in Favor of That Class of Americans Called Africans

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Published in 1833 and 1808, respectively, these volumes were among the earliest examples of abolitionist literature. Child presents a full-scale analysis of slavery in historical, political, economic ... Read full review

Review: An Appeal in Favor of That Class of Americans Called Africans

User Review  - Naomi - Goodreads

Child's abolitionist arguments still ring resoundingly for freedom, human rights, and equality. On this reading (number three or four), the most compelling part of the text are the biographies and the ... Read full review

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Page 32 - I know nothing that could, in this view, be said better, than " do unto others as ye would that others should do unto you...
Page 123 - Ecstasy! My pulse, as yours, doth temperately keep time, And makes as healthful music. It is not madness That I have utter'd : bring me to the test, And I the matter will re-word, which madness Would gambol from. Mother, for love of grace, Lay not that flattering unction to your soul, That not your trespass but my madness speaks; It will but skin and film the ulcerous place, Whiles rank corruption, mining all within, Infects unseen.
Page 130 - Twas for your pleasure you came here you shall go back for mine." Ah, luckless speech, and bootless boast, for which he paid full dear! For, while he spake, a braying ass did sing most loud and clear; Whereat his horse did snort, as he had heard a lion roar, And galloped off with all his might, as he had done before.
Page 51 - And in case any person" or persons shall wilfully cut out the tongue, put out the eye, castrate, or cruelly scald, burn, or deprive any slave of any limb or member, or shall inflict any other cruel punishment, other than by whipping or beating with a horse-whip, cow-skin, switch or small stick, or by putting irons on, or confining or imprisoning such slave, every such person shall, for every such offence, forfeit the sum of one hundred pounds, current money.
Page 168 - Thou hast left behind Powers that will work for thee ; air, earth, and skies ; There's not a breathing of the common wind That will forget thee ; thou hast great allies ; Thy friends are exultations, agonies, And love, and Man's unconquerable mind.
Page 22 - The parent storms, the child looks on, catches the lineaments of wrath, puts on the same airs in the circle of smaller slaves, gives a loose to the worst of passions, and thus nursed, educated, and daily exercised in tyranny, cannot but be stamped by it with odious peculiarities.
Page 48 - Now I say, That the heir, as long as he is a child, differeth nothing from a servant, though he be lord of all ; but is under tutors and governors until the time appointed of the father.
Page 214 - Here under leave of Brutus and the rest (For Brutus is an honorable man; So are they all, all honorable men), Come I to speak in Caesar's funeral.
Page 205 - And he arose and went: and, behold, a man of Ethiopia, an eunuch of great authority under Candace queen of the Ethiopians, who had the charge of all her treasure, and had come to Jerusalem for to worship, was returning, and sitting in his chariot read Esaias the prophet.
Page 8 - History, expressed her concern lest any of the Africans should be carried off without their free consent, declaring, " that it would be detestable and call down the vengeance of Heaven upon the undertakers.

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