The history of Greece under Othoman and Venetian domination (Google eBook)

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W. Blackwood and sons, 1856 - History - 367 pages
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Page 79 - Can tyrants but by tyrants conquered be, And Freedom find no champion and no child Such as Columbia saw arise when she Sprung forth a Pallas, armed and undefiled ? Or must such minds be nourished in the wild, Deep in the unpruned forest, midst the roar Of cataracts, where nursing Nature smiled On infant Washington?
Page 8 - Russians by tho walls of Azof; while to the south the rock of Aden secured their authority over the southern coast of Arabia, invested them with power in the Indian Ocean, and gave them the complete command of the Red Sea. To the east, the Sultan ruled the shores of the Caspian, from the Kour to the Tenek ; and his dominions stretched westward along the southern coast of the Mediterranean, where the farthest limits of the regency of Algiers, beyond Oran, meets the frontiers of the empire of Morocco.
Page 350 - Chiots, who are generally as remarkable for avidity as for industry, he passed his life in independent poverty in order that he might consecrate his whole time and the undivided strength of his mind to improve the moral and political feelings of the Greeks. His efforts have not been fruitless. He...
Page 181 - ... exposed by their often close and questionable relations with Constantinople. Mr. Finlay, who has exposed the results of this contact with, to say the least, an unsparing hand, has nevertheless placed upon record the following remarkable judgment : " The parish priests had an influence on the fate of Greece quite incommensurate with their social rank. The reverence of the peasantry for their Church was increased by the feeling that their own misfortunes were shared by the secular clergy.
Page 297 - ... at Constantinople, it was founded by a Chiot family. Two sons of Alexander Mavrocordatos. Nicolas and John, and a grandson, Constantine, held at different times the offices of dragoman of the Porte, of voivode of Moldavia, and of voivode of Vallachia. The Greeks gained no honour and little permanent advantage by their power in the Transdanubian provinces. Their administration was more corrupt and oppressive than that of the Turks in the adjoining pashaliks. The Phanariots, intent only on accumulating...
Page 100 - If the gentlemen of these colonies do tyrannize over the villages of their dominion, the best way is not to seem to see it, that there may be no kindness between them and their subjects; but if they offend in any thing else, 'twill be well to chastise them severely, that they may not brag of any privileges more than others.
Page 297 - R z [Ch.V. race in the Othoman dominions was exposed to such unmitigated extortion and cruelty. The Othoman Turks were better masters to the various races they conquered, than the Phanariot Greeks to the fellow-Christians committed to their care and protection. A detailed examination of the vices of the Greek administration in Vallachia and Moldavia does not lie within the sphere of this work ; but it would form an important object of inquiry in any complete history of the political condition of...
Page 2 - Morea and the duchy of Athens. Garrisons of the sultan's regular troops were stationed in a few of the strongest fortresses under their own officers ; but the general defence of the country and the maintenance of order among the inhabitants was intrusted to Saganos, who was invested with the revenue necessary for the purpose. The arbitrary power of the pasha and the license of the regular garrisons were restrained by the timariot system. The feudal usages, which the earliest...
Page 181 - ... following remarkable judgment : " The parish priests had an influence on the fate of Greece quite incommensurate with their social rank. The reverence of the peasantry for their Church was increased by the feeling that their own misfortunes were shared by the secular clergy. ... To their conduct we must surely attribute the confidence, which the agricultural population retained in the promises of the G-ospel, and their firm persistence in a persecuted faith. The grace of God operated by human...
Page 8 - Syria and Egypt, of the fierce corsairs of Northern Africa, expelled the Venetians from Cyprus, Crete, and the Archipelago, and drove the Knights of St. John of Jerusalem from the Levant, to find a shelter at Malta. It was no vain boast of the Ottoman sultan, that he was the master of many kingdoms, the ruler of three continents, and the lord of two seas.

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