The Harp and the Cross: A Collection of Religious Poetry (Google eBook)

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American Unitarian Association, 1857 - Religious poetry, English - 348 pages
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Page 258 - That nothing walks with aimless feet ; That not one life shall be destroyed, Or cast as rubbish to the void, When God hath made the pile complete...
Page 142 - Hence in a season of calm weather Though inland far we be, Our Souls have sight of that immortal sea Which brought us hither, Can in a moment travel thither, And see the Children sport upon the shore, And hear the mighty waters rolling evermore.
Page 107 - And Jesus said unto them, Verily I say unto you, That ye which have followed me, in the regeneration when the Son of man shall sit in the throne of his glory, ye also shall sit upon twelve thrones, judging the twelve tribes of Israel.
Page 147 - I'd be Nearer my God to Thee, Nearer to Thee. 3 There let the way appear Steps unto heaven; All that Thou sendest me, In mercy given; Angels to beckon me Nearer, my God, to Thee, Nearer to Thee.
Page 335 - IN the hour of my distress, When temptations me oppress, And when I my sins confess, Sweet Spirit, comfort me ! When I lie within my bed, Sick in heart and sick in head, And with doubts discomforted, Sweet Spirit, comfort me...
Page 136 - I SAY to thee, do thou repeat To the first man thou mayest meet In lane, highway, or open street, That he and we and all men move Under a canopy of love, As broad as the blue sky above ; That doubt and trouble, fear and pain, And anguish, all are shadows vain, That death itself shall not remain ; That weary deserts we may tread, A dreary labyrinth may thread, Through dark ways underground be led; Yet, if we will...
Page 61 - IT was the calm and silent night ! Seven hundred years and fifty-three Had Rome been growing up to might, And now was queen of land and sea. No sound was heard of clashing wars Peace brooded o'er the hushed domain ; Apollo, Pallas, Jove, and Mars Held undisturbed their ancient reign, In the solemn midnight, Centuries ago.
Page 261 - One song employs all nations; and all cry, ' Worthy the Lamb, for he was slain for us!' The dwellers in the vales and on the rocks Shout to each other, and the mountain tops From distant mountains catch the flying joy; Till, nation after nation taught the strain, Earth rolls the rapturous Hosanna round.
Page 62 - Twas in the calm and silent night! The Senator of haughty Rome Impatient urged his chariot's flight, From lordly revel rolling home: Triumphal arches, gleaming, swell His breast with thoughts of boundless sway: What recked the Roman what befell A paltry province far away, In the solemn midnight, Centuries ago?
Page 51 - And no man dug that sepulchre, And no man saw it e'er ; For the angels of God upturned the sod, And laid the dead man there. That was the grandest funeral That ever passed on earth, But no man heard the trampling, Or saw that train go forth. Noiselessly as the daylight Comes when the night is done, And the crimson streak on ocean's cheek Grows into the great sun ; Noiselessly as the spring-time Her crown of verdure weaves, And all the trees on all the hills Open their thousand leaves...

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