Blackwood's Edinburgh Magazine, Volume 34 (Google eBook)

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W. Blackwood, 1833
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Rufino, "Floribus omnigenis...": En la página 991 de esta antología griega en lengua inglesa, aparece el texto Rodhocleas que cita el conde de Mora como origen del tópico de la fugacidad de la belleza de la rosa, del que se hace eco Medinilla en los últ. versos de la estanza 18: "Que la hermosura en fin es flor y como flores dura". Aparece el texto en griego y la traducción a otros idiomas, entre ellos el latín...  

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Page 313 - Straight mine eye hath caught new pleasures Whilst the landscape round it measures ; Russet lawns, and fallows gray, Where the nibbling flocks do stray ; Mountains, on whose barren breast The labouring clouds do often rest ; Meadows trim with daisies pied, Shallow brooks, and rivers wide ; Towers and battlements it sees Bosom'd high in tufted trees, Where perhaps some Beauty lies, The Cynosure of neighbouring eyes.
Page 314 - And, as I wake, sweet music breathe Above, about, or underneath, Sent by some Spirit to mortals good, Or the unseen Genius of the wood.
Page 322 - When at length Hyder Ali found that he had to do with men who either would sign no convention, or whom no treaty and no signature could bind, and who were the determined enemies of human intercourse itself, he decreed to make the country possessed by these incorrigible and predestinated criminals a memorable example to mankind. He resolved, in the gloomy recesses of a mind capacious of such things, to leave the whole Carnatic an everlasting monument of vengeance, and to put perpetual desolation as...
Page 77 - There is a pleasure in the pathless woods, There is a rapture on the lonely shore. There is society where none intrudes, By the deep sea, and music in its roar; I love not man the less, but nature more...
Page 46 - England has erected no churches, no hospitals, no palaces, no schools ; England has built no bridges, made no high roads, cut no navigations, dug out no reservoirs. Every other conqueror of every other description has left some monument, either of state or beneficence, behind him. Were we to be driven out of India this day, nothing would remain to tell that it had been possessed, during the inglorious period of our dominion, by any thing better than the ourang-outang or the tiger.
Page 322 - Having terminated his disputes with every enemy, and every rival, who buried their mutual animosities in their common detestation against the creditors of the Nabob of Arcot, he drew, from every quarter, whatever a savage ferocity could add...
Page 35 - ... temples, not to make accurate measurements of the remains of ancient grandeur, nor to form a scale of the curiosity of modern art, not to collect medals or collate manuscripts — but to dive into the depths of dungeons, to plunge into the infection of hospitals, to survey the mansions of sorrow and pain, to take the gauge and dimensions of misery, depression and contempt, to remember the forgotten, to attend to the neglected, to visit the forsaken, and to compare and collate the distresses of...
Page 313 - Embattled in her field, and the humble shrub, And bush with frizzled hair implicit : Last Rose, as in dance, the stately trees, and spread Their branches hung with copious fruit, or gemm'd Their blossoms: With high .woods the hills were crown'd ; With tufts the valleys, and each fountain side ; With borders long the rivers : that Earth now Seem'd like to Heaven, a seat where Gods might dwell, Or wander with delight, and love to haunt Her sacred shades...
Page 470 - She, wretched matron, forced in age, for bread, To strip the brook with mantling cresses spread, To pick her wintry fagot from the thorn, , To seek her nightly shed, and weep till morn; She only left of all the harmless train, The sad historian of the pensive plain...
Page 35 - He has visited all Europe,— not to survey the sumptuousness of palaces, or the stateliness of temples; not to make accurate measurements of the remains of ancient grandeur, nor to form a scale of the curiosity of modern art; not to collect medals, or...

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