Cynthia ; and, the legend of Cassandra (Google eBook)

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Printed by Beldornie Press, 1595 - 44 pages
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Page 1 - I could point out whole sets of sonnets written with this sort of attachment, for which, perhaps, it will be but an inadequate apology, that they are free from direct impurity of expression and open immodesty of sentiment. Such at least is our observance of external propriety, and so strong the principles of a general decorum, that a writer of the present age who was to print love-verses in this style, would be severely reproached, and universally proscribed.
Page 4 - To this for beautie; fairest on the earth. Thus, hoping you will beare with my rude conceit of Cynthia, (if for no other cause, yet, for that it is the first imitation of the verse of that excellent Poet, Maister Spencer, in his Fayrie Queene) I leave you to the reading of that, which I so much desire may breed your Delight.
Page 32 - Temple, to conspire Against the Greekes, (whom he to war did bring) Shee, (like a Furie), in a bedlam rage, Runs gadding thither, his fell wrath t'assuage. But not preuailing : truely she fore-tolde The fall of Troy (with bold erected face :) They count her hare-brain'd, mad, and ouer-bold, To presse in presence in so graue a place : But in meane season Paris he is gone, To bring destruction on faire Ilion.
Page 1 - Some there were, that did interpret The affectionate Shepheard, otherwise then (in truth) I meant, touching the...
Page 17 - Queen, this gorgeous dame, Fame borrowing al men's mouths to royalize the same. And with this sentence lupiter did end, This is the Pricke (quoth he), this is the praies, To whom, this as a Present I will send, That shameth Cynthia in her siluer Raies, If so you three this deed doe not displease. Then one, and all, and euery one of them, To her that is the honour of her daies, A second ludith in IERVSALEM.
Page 3 - November 1594] there came forth a little toy of mine, intituled, The affectionate Shepheard : In the which, his Country Content found such friendly fauor, that it hath incouraged me to publish my second fruites.
Page 2 - Shakspeare, and such is the variation in prices of pieces of this kind, that if it were now to be produced at an auction, it would undoubtedly be sold for three or four guineas. " The very rare copy of Shakspeare's Venus and Adonis, 1596, originally made part of this volume, but on re-binding it I took out that piece in order to place it with my other early editions of Shakspeare's pieces. I have also changed the place of Constable's Sonnets...
Page 31 - Queene of my thoughts, but subiect of my verse, (Divine Eliza) pardon my defect : Whose artlesse pen so rudely doth reherse Thy beauties worth ; (for want of due respect) Oh pardon thou the follies of my youth ; Pardon my faith, my loue, my zeale, my truth.
Page 31 - ... of my verse, (Divine Eliza.) pardon my defect : Whose artlesse pen so rudely doth reherse Thy beauties worth ; (for want of due respect) Oh pardon thou the follies of my youth ; Pardon my faith, my loue, my zeale, my truth. But to Cassandra, now : who hauing heard The cruell sentence of the threatning voice ; At length (too late) begins to waxe affeard, Lamenting much her vnrepentant choice : And seeing her hard hap without reliefe, She sheeds salt teares in token of her griefe. Which when Aurora...

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