Asian Americans: Achievement Beyond IQ

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Psychology Press, 1991 - Education - 169 pages
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This authoritative book shows how the gap between a group's mean IQ and achievement can be precisely measured, and then partitioned between two factors -- an important methodology with potential application for all ethnic groups. In this case, the author shows that Chinese Americans' occupational achievements are generally far beyond their IQ -- as if they had a mean IQ 21 points higher than they actually do. This unique approach to explaining group achievement emphasizes non-IQ factors such as historical origins, family, work ethic, educational tradition, personality traits, and social institutions.
  

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Contents

THE THREE GREAT
16
ELEVEN STUDIES
32
THE TWO FACTORS
78
AND THE TENTATIVE
102
BEYOND GENES AND IQ
112
8
140
References
147
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Page 151 - Proceedings of the 1972 Invitational Conference on Testing Problems. Princeton, NJ: Educational Testing Service.

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About the author (1991)

James R. Flynn is Professor Emeritus at the University of Otago, New Zealand, and a recipient of the University's Gold Medal for Distinguished Career Research. In 2007, the International Society for Intelligence Research named him its Distinguished Contributor of the Year. He has been Distinguished Visiting Fellow at the Hoover Institution, Stanford, Distinguished Visiting Speaker at Cornell, delivered the Stafford Little Lecture at Princeton, and been profiled in Scientific American. Professor Flynn has recently published his current views on race and IQ in Where Have All the Liberals Gone? Race, Class, and Ideals in America (Cambridge, 2008).

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