Reliques of Ancient English Poetry: Consisting of Old Heroic Ballads, Songs, and Other Pieces of Our Earlier Poets, (chiefly of the Lyric King) Together with Some Few of Later Date ... (Google eBook)

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J. Dodsley, 1765 - Ballads, English
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Page 208 - Crabbed age and youth Cannot live together ; Youth is full of pleasance, Age is full of care: Youth like summer morn, Age like winter weather ; Youth like summer brave, Age like winter bare. Youth is full of sport, Age's breath is short, Youth is nimble, age is lame : Youth is hot and bold, Age is weak and cold ; Youth is wild, and age is tame.
Page 189 - The shepherd swains shall dance and sing For thy delight each May morning: If these delights thy mind may move, Then live with me and be my love.
Page 233 - Some men with swords may reap the field, And plant fresh laurels where they kill: But their strong nerves at last must yield; They tame but one another still: Early or late They stoop to fate, And must give up their murmuring breath, When they, pale captives, creep to death. The garlands wither on your brow, Then boast no more your mighty deeds; Upon Death's purple altar now See, where the victor-victim bleeds: Your heads must come To the cold tomb; Only the actions of the just Smell sweet, and blossom...
Page 258 - They are but poor, though much they have, And I am rich with little store: They poor, I rich; they beg, I give; They lack, I leave; they pine, I live.
Page 69 - Late late yestreen I saw the new moone, Wi the auld moone in hir arme, And I feir, I feir, my deir master, That we will cum to harme.
Page 177 - IN Venice towne not long agoe A cruel Jew did dwell, Which lived all on usurie, As Italian writers tell.
Page 257 - Content I live, this is my stay, I seek no more than may suffice; I press to bear no haughty sway; Look, what I lack my mind supplies. Lo! thus I triumph like a king, Content with that my mind doth bring.
Page 200 - KING Leir once rule"d in this land With princely power and peace, And had all things, with hearts content, That might his joys increase. Amongst those things that nature gave, Three daughters fair had he, So princely seeming beautiful, As fairer could not be. So on a time it pleas'd the king A question thus to move, Which of his daughters to his grace Could shew the dearest love : " For to my age you bring content...
Page 227 - With that, there came an arrow keen Out of an English bow, Which struck Earl Douglas to the heart, A deep and deadly blow ; Who never spake more words than these, " Fight on, my merry men all ; For why, my life is at an end, Lord Percy sees my fall.
Page 237 - O goe to the court yet, good my lord, And take thy gallant men with thee : If any dare to doe you wrong, Then your warrant they may bee. Now nay, now nay, thou lady faire, The court is full of subtiltie ; And if I goe to the court, ladye, Never more I may thee see. Yet goe to the court, my lord...

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