The Master of the Inn

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Kessinger Publishing, Jan 1, 2005 - Fiction - 92 pages
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1908. Herrick wrote realistic social novels about the conflict between professional and personal values in American capitalistic society. The Master of the Inn begins: It was a plain brick house, three full stories, with four broad chimneys, and overhanging eaves. The tradition was that it had been a colonial tavern-a dot among the fir-covered northern hills on the climbing post-road into Canada. The village scattered along the road below the inn was called Albany-and soon forgotten when the railroad sought an opening through a valley less rugged, eight miles to the west. Due to the age and scarcity of the original we reproduced, some pages may be spotty or faded.

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About the author (2005)

Robert Herrick is one of the Cavalier poets and the most gifted of the "tribe of Ben", the small band of poets influenced by Ben Jonson. Herrick is considered one of the greatest English songwriters. He published only one volume of verse, an astonishing collection of 1,200 poems known as the Hesperides and Noble Numbers (1648). Although Herrick was an Anglican priest, many of his poems deal with sensual pleasures, stressing the need for carpe diem - to seize the day - since youth and joy pass so quickly. Herrick's verse is intensely musical and reflects classical and Anglican ceremony, English folklore, and timeless myth. He is best known for his short poem, "To Virgins, To Make Much of Time," which begins, "Gather ye rosebuds while ye may," encouraging young people to enjoy themselves while they still can.

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