Plutarch's Lives (Volume 2 of 2) (Google eBook)

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Digireads.com Publishing, Jan 1, 2010 - Biography & Autobiography
37 Reviews
"Lives" is a series of biographies of famous Greeks and Romans by the ancient Greek historian Plutarch who lived during the first and second century AD. "Lives" consists of twenty-three paired biographies, one Greek and one Roman, and four unpaired, which explore the influence of character on the lives and destinies of the subjects. Rather than providing strictly historical accounts, Plutarch was most concerned with capturing this issue of character. This volume, volume 2 of 2, contains the second half of this classic history in which you will find the biographies of the following persons: Sertorius, Eumenes, Agesilaus, Pompey, Alexander, Cæsar, Phocion, Cato the younger, Agis, Cleomenes, Tiberius Gracchus, Caius Gracchus, Demosthenes, Cicero, Demetrius, Antony, Dion, Marcus Brutus, Aratus, Artaxerxes, Galba, and Otho.
  

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This is a wonderful introduction to classical Greece. - Goodreads
Difficult to read, interesting just the same. - Goodreads
Plutarch has a unique insight into the human condition. - Goodreads

Review: Plutarch's Lives, Volume 1

User Review  - Steve Hemmeke - Goodreads

I only read the first six or so lives, not the whole thing. Plutarch, a Greek living in Roman times, compares famous Greeks and Romans. His focus is political and military. How does one shape the ... Read full review

Review: Plutarch's Lives, Volume 1

User Review  - Lillian - Goodreads

Read for (yet another) book group discussion. Looking forward to it! Read full review

Selected pages

Contents

SERTORIUS
5
EUMENES
20
THE COMPARISON OF SERTORIUS WITH EUMENES
31
AGESILAUS
32
POMPEY
55
THE COMPARISON OF POMPEY AND AGESILAUS
102
ALEXANDER
105
CÆSAR
149
DEMOSTHENES
286
CICERO
302
COMPARISON OF DEMOSTHENES AND CICERO
326
DEMETRIUS
328
ANTONY
355
COMPARISON OF DEMETRIUS AND ANTONY
394
DION
395
MARCUS BRUTUS
421

PHOCION
182
CATO THE YOUNGER
200
AGIS
235
CLEOMENES
245
TIBERIUS GRACCHUS
262
CAIUS GRACCHUS
274
COMPARISON OF TIBERIUS AND CAIUS GRACCHUS WITH AGIS AND CLEOMENES
284
COMPARISON OF DION AND BRUTUS
448
ARATUS
450
ARTAXERXES
474
GALBA
490
OTHO
503
Copyright

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About the author (2010)

PLUTARCH. c.46--c.125 Considered by many to be the most important Greek writer of the early Roman period, Plutarch was a member of a well-to-do Greek family, a chief magistrate, a priest at Delphi, and an exceptionally well-read individual. His philosophical views were based on those of Plato and, although a Greek, he esteemed the achievements and attributes of the Romans. By the time Plutarch's works were published for the first time in the eleventh century, some had already been lost. He wrote innumerable essays on philosophical, historical, political, religious, and literary subjects, 78 of which survive today and are known collectively as the "Moralia." He is known primarily, however, for his Parallel Lives of Greeks and Romans, which consists of 50 biographies---23 of prominent Greeks, 23 of Roman leaders, and 4 separate lives---accompanied at intervals by short comparative essays. Although historical information is included in the work, Plutarch wrote it originally to inspire emulation in youth, so the emphasis is on character, moral choice, and anecdote. Sir Thomas North's 1579 translation into English of Parallel Lives became an important source for William Shakespeare which he used for three plays, Julius Caesar, Antony and Cleopatra, and Coriolanus.

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