A Tale of Two Cities (Google eBook)

Front Cover
Digireads.com Publishing, Jan 1, 2004 - Fiction
72 Reviews
"It was the best of times, it was the worst times," so begins the famous first lines of one of Charles Dickens most popular novels. "A Tale of Two Cities" is a story set in the late 18th century during the French Revolution and the title cities in question are that of London and Paris. At the heart of the novel is the story of a young Englishman who sacrifices his life to save the husband of a woman he loves. "A Tale of Two Cities" is a classic love story set against the backdrop of political upheaval and revolution.
  

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Most satisfying ending in the English language. - Goodreads
It was long, boring, hard to read. - Goodreads
The plot is intricate and beautiful. - Goodreads
I still love his prose. - Goodreads
I have never enjoyed Charles Dickens' writing. - Goodreads

Review: A Tale of Two Cities

User Review  - midnightfaerie - Goodreads

"It is a far, far better thing that I do, than I have ever done; it is a far, far better rest that I go to than I have ever known." Why have I always assumed that quote was from Shakespeare? I've ... Read full review

Review: A Tale of Two Cities

User Review  - Jason Koivu - Goodreads

Hands down my favorite Dickens' I've read yet! It's got love, sacrifice, revenge, revolt and other exciting verbs! I'm a big fan of a solid marriage between character development and action. A Tale of ... Read full review

All 19 reviews »

Selected pages

Contents

Book the First Recalled to Life Chapter I The Period p
5
The Mail p
6
The Night Shadows p
10
The Preparation p
12
The Wineshop p
19
The Shoemaker p
26
Book the Second The Golden Thread Chapter I Five Years Later p
32
A Sight p
36
Nine Days p
115
An Opinion p
119
A Plea p
123
Echoing Footsteps p
126
The Sea Still Rises p
132
Fire Rises p
135
Drawn to the Loadstone Rock p
140
Book the Third the Track of a Storm ChapterI In Secret p
147

A Disappointment p
40
Congratulatory p
48
The Jackal p
52
Hundreds of People p
55
Monseigneur in Town p
63
Monseigneur in the Country p
68
The Gorgons Head p
71
Two Promises p
78
A Companion Picture p
83
The Fellow of Delicacy p
85
The Fellow of no Delicacy p
90
The Honest Tradesman p
92
Knitting p
99
Still Knitting p
105
One Night p
112
The Grindstone p
154
The Shadow p
157
Calm in Storm p
161
The Woodsawyer p
164
Triumph p
167
A Knock at the Door p
171
A Hand at Cards p
174
The Game Made p
182
The Substance of the Shadow p
190
Dusk p
199
Darkness p
201
Fiftytwo p
206
The Knitting Done p
214
The Footsteps die out for ever p
221
Copyright

Common terms and phrases

Popular passages

Page 5 - Heaven, we were all going direct the other way in short, the period was so far like the present period, that some of its noisiest authorities insisted on its being received, for good or for evil, in the superlative degree of comparison only.
Page 5 - IT was the best of times, it was the worst of times, it was the age of wisdom, it was the age of foolishness, it was the epoch of belief, it was the epoch of incredulity, it was the season of Light, it was the season of Darkness, it was the spring of hope, it was the winter of despair, we had everything before us, we had nothing before us, we were all going direct to Heaven, we were all going direct the other way...
Page 10 - A WONDERFUL fact to reflect upon, that every human creature is constituted to be that profound secret and mystery to every other. A solemn consideration, when I enter a great city by night, that every one of those darkly clustered houses...
Page 20 - Hunger. It was prevalent everywhere. Hunger was pushed out of the tall houses, in the wretched clothing that hung upon poles and lines; Hunger was patched into them with straw and rag and wood and paper; Hunger was repeated in every fragment of the small modicum of firewood that the man sawed off; Hunger stared down from the smokeless chimneys, and started up from the filthy street that had no offal, among its refuse, of anything to eat.

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About the author (2004)

Charles Dickens, perhaps the best British novelist of the Victorian era, was born in Portsmouth, Hampshire, England on February 7, 1812. His happy early childhood was interrupted when his father was sent to debtors' prison, and young Dickens had to go to work in a factory at age twelve. Later, he took jobs as an office boy and journalist before publishing essays and stories in the 1830s. His first novel, The Pickwick Papers, made him a famous and popular author at the age of twenty-five. Subsequent works were published serially in periodicals and cemented his reputation as a master of colorful characterization, and as a harsh critic of social evils and corrupt institutions. His many books include Oliver Twist, David Copperfield, Bleak House, Great Expectations, Little Dorrit, A Christmas Carol, and A Tale of Two Cities. Dickens married Catherine Hogarth in 1836, and the couple had nine children before separating in 1858 when he began a long affair with Ellen Ternan, a young actress. Despite the scandal, Dickens remained a public figure, appearing often to read his fiction. He died in 1870, leaving his final novel, The Mystery of Edwin Drood, unfinished.

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