Gleams of truth: or, Scenes from real life (Google eBook)

Front Cover
James Munroe and Company, 1835 - 108 pages
0 Reviews
  

What people are saying - Write a review

We haven't found any reviews in the usual places.

Common terms and phrases

Popular passages

Page 96 - And he called unto him his disciples, and said unto them, verily I say unto you, that this poor widow hath cast more in, than all they that have cast into the treasury. For all they did cast in of their abundance. But she, of her want, did cast in all that she had, even all her living.
Page 57 - I am going out ;" and then she would be carried out in her sedan. She was too lame to walk, and could not easily get into a coach. I used to take a little basket and go by her side. We would soon stop at a cellar, into which she sent me to see how the poor woman was ; and when I had come out again...
Page 93 - She was ever most careful not to incur a debt, maintaining her sense of duty on this subject with an energy worthy of all praise. Had she been embarrassed by debt, she could have carried through few of her benevolent intentions. Her whole history presents a striking combination of simplicity with energy, sensibility with judgment, of forethought, calculation, and economy, with disinterestedness and self-sacrificing benevolence. To a pious reliance on Providence she...
Page 76 - She never omitted once a week to send her a little tea and sugar, that she might not be made uncomfortable by the want of these accustomed gratifications. It happened that this poor blind woman had a son in the workhouse, who was a cripple, and nearly an idiot. The child was dear to his mother ; and when she took her tea, she gave him a part of it. This became one of his highest gratifications ; and after the death of his mother, he was greatly distressed by the loss of this indulgence. Catherine...
Page 99 - Saviour to do to others as we would that others should do to us should induce Friends who held slaves " to set them at liberty, making a Christian provision for them...
Page 77 - ... in her hand. On noticing these parcels, she informed the visitor that they contained a little tea, sugar, and snuff, and that they were for a woman in the workhouse nearly a hundred years old. " She knew my parents," said Catherine ; " and I daresay assisted my mother when she needed ; so it is just a little acknowledgment. There are other old persons there to whom I would be glad to send something, if I had the means.
Page 79 - Catherine visited this woman, gained her confidence, persuaded her to allow her eldest boy to be put into the workhouse, and took the youngest, about two years old, under her own charge. She nursed this child carefully, sent some of her own clothes to the mother, and took a change of clothes to her...
Page 91 - Saturday night. It does not appear that she has ever thus lost anything, while the gain has been of considerable importance to those who have made it. She has mixed but little with her neighbours, except for such offices of kindness as she could render to them ; and most unwillingly asks for any aid for her own personal...
Page 57 - Catherine, poverty will probably be your portion ; but you have one talent which you may use for the good of others. You may sometimes read half an hour to a poor sick neighbour. You may read a chapter of the Bible to her when she could not read it herself ; or you may run errands for those who have no one else to go for them.
Page 66 - ... go to service in a family. The lady of the house was a very good manager, and a good mistress ; knew what a servant's duty was, and took care that it was well done. In her family Catherine's habits of diligence, order, and fidelity were strengthened. Everything she saw there tended to advance her education. And is it not the true idea of education, that it comprehends all the daily and hourly influences, small as well as great, of the circumstances by which we are surrounded, and which are constantly...

Bibliographic information