Vestiges of the Natural History of Creation (Google eBook)

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John Churchill, Princes Street, Soho., 1844 - Creation - 390 pages
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Contents

I
1
II
27
III
44
IV
54
V
66
VI
76
VII
94
VIII
105
XI
134
XII
145
XIII
165
XIV
191
XV
236
XVI
277
XVII
324
XVIII
361

IX
116
X
125
XIX
387

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Page 360 - The inorganic has one final comprehensive law, GRAVITATION. The organic, the other great department of mundane things, rests in like manner on one law, and that is DEVELOPMENT. Nor may even these be after all twain, but only branches of one still more comprehensive law, the expression of that unity which man's wit can scarcely separate from Deity itself...
Page 222 - ... the simplest and most primitive type under a law to which that of like production is subordinate, gave birth to the type next above it, that this again produced the next higher, and so on to the very highest, the stages of advance being in all cases very small namely, from one species only to another; so that the phenomenon has alwiiys been of a simple and modest character.
Page 154 - Deity, but of natural laws which are the expression of His will. What is to hinder our supposing that the organic creation is also a result of natural laws which are in like manner an expression of His will? (p. 154, 1st edition). And creation " operating by law " is constantly cited as relieving the Creator from trouble about insignificant details.
Page 234 - It has pleased Providence to arrange that one species should give birth to another, until the second highest gave birth to man, who is the very highest: be it so, it is our part to admire and to submit. The very faintest notion of there being anything ridiculous or degrading in the theory how absurd does it appear, when we remember that every individual amongst us actually passes through the characters of the insect, the fish, and reptile (to speak nothing of others,) before he is permitted to...
Page 172 - Jissiparous generation. So that all animated nature may be said to be based on this mode of origin ; the fundamental form of organic being is a globule, having a new globule forming within itself, by which it is in time * See Dr.
Page 202 - Here we apparently have very clear demonstrations of a parity, or rather identity, of laws presiding over the development of the animated tribes on the face of the earth, and that of the individual in embryo. The tendency of all these illustrations is to make us look to development as the principle which has been immediately concerned in the peopling of this globe, a process extending over a vast space of time, but which is nevertheless connected in character with the briefer process by which an...
Page 63 - ... the fossil sharks of the later formations, resemble lines of miniature pyramids, larger and smaller alternating; some with teeth sharp, thin, and so deeply serrated that every individual tooth resembles a row of poniards set up against the walls of an armory ; and these last, says Agassiz, furnished with weapons so murderous, must have been the pirates of the period.
Page 389 - ... at first sight, like geology, not in perfect harmony with that record, and arranges all the rest into a system which partakes of the same character. But may not the sacred text, on a liberal interpretation, or with the benefit of new light reflected from nature, or derived from learning, be shewn to be as much in harmony with the novelties of this volume as it has been with geology and natural philosophy...
Page 153 - ... of this creative power at one time ^to produce zoophytes, another time to add a few marine mollusks, another to bring in one or two conchifers, again to produce crustaceous fishes, again perfect fishes, and so on to the end? This would surely be to take a very mean view of the Creative Power to, in short, anthropomorphize it. or reduce it to some such character as that borne by the ordinary proceedings of mankind.
Page 307 - The leading characters, in short, of the various races of mankind, are simply representations of particular stages in the development of the highest or Caucasian type. The Negro exhibits permanently the imperfect brain, projecting lower jaw, and slender bent limbs, of a Caucasian child, some considerable time before the period of its birth.

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