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" He loved not the muses so well as his sport, And prized black eyes, or a lucky hit At bowls above all the trophies of wit; But Apollo was angry, and publicly said, 'Twere fit that a fine were set upon 's head. "
The Dictionary of National Biography - Page 142
edited by - 1909
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The Works of Sir John Suckling: Containing His Poems, Letters and Plays

Sir John Suckling - English literature - 1709 - 376 pages
...That of all Men living he cared not for't, He lov'd not the Mufes fo well as his Sport j And priz'd black Eyes, or a lucky Hit At Bowls, above all the Trophies of "" But Afollo was angry, and publickly faid Twere fit that a Fine were fet upon's Head. Wat Montague...
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Miscellany Poems: Containing Variety of New Translations of the ..., Volume 1

John Dryden - Classical poetry - 1716 - 420 pages
...That of all Men living he car'd not for'r, He lov'd not the Mufes fo well as his Sport ; And priz'd black Eyes, or a lucky Hit At Bowls, above all the Trophies of Wit : But ^ptllo was angry, and publickly faid, 'Twerefit that a Fine were fet npon's Head. Wat Mo*ta.ffto...
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The works of the English poets, from Chaucer to Cowper

Samuel Johnson - English poetry (Collections) - 1810
...That of all men living he cared not for't, He loved not the Muses so well as his sport; An1 prized black eyes, or a lucky hit At bowls, above all the trophies of wit ; But Apollo was angry, and publickly said, 'Twere fit that a fine were set upon's head. Wat Montague...
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Retrospective Review: And Historical and Antiquarian Magazine, Volume 9

Henry Southern, Sir Nicholas Harris Nicolas - 1824
...That of all men living he cared not for't, He loved not the muses so well as his sport ; And prized black eyes, or a lucky hit At bowls, above all the trophies of wit ; But Apollo was angry, and publickly said 'Twere fit that a fine were set upon's head. Wat Montague...
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The Retrospective Review

Henry Southern - Books - 1824
...That of all men living he cared not for't. He loved not the muses so well as his sport ; And prized black eyes, or a lucky hit At bowls, above all the trophies of wit ; , But Apollo was angry, and publickly said 'Twere fit that a fine were set upon's head. Wat Montague...
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The Retrospective Review

Books - 1824
...That of all men living he cared not for't, He loved not the muses so well as his sport ; And prized black eyes, or a lucky hit At bowls, above all the trophies of wit ; But Apollo was angry, and publickly said 'Twere fit that a fine were set upon's head, Wat Montague...
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The Companion, by L. Hunt

Leigh Hunt - 1828
...That of all men living he car'd not for 't, He lov'd not the Muses so well as his sport ; And priz'd black eyes, or a lucky hit At bowls, above all the trophies of wit ; But Apollo was angry and publicly said 'Twere fit that a fine were set upon's head. ******* Hales...
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The companion

Leigh Hunt - Literary Criticism - 1828 - 432 pages
...But straight one whisper'd Apollo i' th' ear, He lov'd not the Muses so well as his sport; And priz'd black eyes, or a lucky hit At bowls, above all the trophies of wit; But Apollo was angry and publicly said 'Twere fit that a fine were set upon's head. ******* Hales sat...
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The poetical works of Leigh Hunt

Leigh Hunt - 1832 - 455 pages
...number of fine vulgar people agree to call them so. The fashion was once otherwise. Suckling prefers A pair of black eyes, or a lucky hit At bowls, above all the trophies of wit. Piccadilly, in Clarendon's time, " was a fair house of entertainment and gaming, with handsome gravel...
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The poetical works of Leigh Hunt

Leigh Hunt - 1832 - 361 pages
...number of fine vulgar people agree to call them so. The fashion was once otherwise. Suckling prefers A pair of black eyes, or a lucky hit At bowls, above all the trophies of wit. Piccadilly, in Clarendon's time, " was a fair house of entertainment and gaming, with handsome gravel...
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