Problem solver in automatic control systems/robotics

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Research and Education Association, Nov 30, 1982 - Study Aids - 1076 pages
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Each Problem Solver is an insightful and essential study and solution guide chock-full of clear, concise problem-solving gems. All your questions can be found in one convenient source from one of the most trusted names in reference solution guides. More useful, more practical, and more informative, these study aids are the best review books and textbook companions available. Nothing remotely as comprehensive or as helpful exists in their subject anywhere. Perfect for undergraduate and graduate studies.

Here in this highly useful reference is the finest overview of automatic control systems / robotics currently available, with hundreds of control systems / robotics problems that cover everything from modeling and matrices to system stability and nonlinear systems. Each problem is clearly solved with step-by-step detailed solutions.

DETAILS
- The PROBLEM SOLVERS are unique - the ultimate in study guides.
- They are ideal for helping students cope with the toughest subjects.
- They greatly simplify study and learning tasks.
- They enable students to come to grips with difficult problems by showing them the way, step-by-step, toward solving problems. As a result, they save hours of frustration and time spent on groping for answers and understanding.
- They cover material ranging from the elementary to the advanced in each subject.
- They work exceptionally well with any text in its field.
- PROBLEM SOLVERS are available in 41 subjects.
- Each PROBLEM SOLVER is prepared by supremely knowledgeable experts.
- Most are over 1000 pages.
- PROBLEM SOLVERS are not meant to be read cover to cover. They offer whatever may be needed at a given time. An excellent index helps to locate specific problems rapidly.
- Educators consider the PROBLEM SOLVERS the most effective and valuable study aids; students describe them as "fantastic" - the best books on the market.

TABLE OF CONTENTS
Introduction
Chapter 1: Modeling
Block Diagram
Transfer Function
Chapter 2: Matrices
Rank, Analysis of Inverse Matrices
Eigenvectors and Diagonalization
Chapter 3: Laplace Transforms
Laplace Transforms and Theorems
Inverse Laplace Transforms and Solutions of Differential Equations
Chapter 4: Z-Transforms
Z-transforms and Theorems
Inverse Z-transforms and Response of Systems
Chapter 5: Transfer Function and Block Diagrams
Transfer Functions from Block Diagrams
Transfer Functions of Networks and Systems
The Transfer Matrix and Pulse Transfer Function
Chapter 6: Time Analysis
Response
Response - Discrete
Response - Error
Chapter 7: Frequency Analysis, Nyquist Diagram, Root Locus, Bode Diagram
Nyquist Diagram
Root Locus
Bode Diagram
Frequency Response
Chapter 8: Design and Compensation
Design
Frequency Response
Bilinear Transform
Compensation
Lag Compensation, Root Locus
Controller
Compensator, Observer
Root Locus
Chapter 9: State Space Representation
State Space Representation of Transfer Functions
Transformation of Differential Equations into State Space Representation
State Space Representation from Block Diagrams and Difference Equations
State Space Representation of Electrical and Mechanical Systems
Chapter 10: State Transition Matrix
Methods of Determining the State Transition Matrix
State Transition Matrix of Systems
Chapter 11: Solutions to State Equations
Chapter 12: Controllability and Observability
Chapter 13: Automatic Control Stability
Routh and Herwits Critera
Krasovskii Theorem
Liapunov Function
Different Kinds of Stability-Jury Test
Discrete Systems
Phase Plane
Root Locus
Nyquist Bode
Chapter 14: Phase Plane Analysis
Initial Conditions
Method of Isoclines
Application to Networks and Systems
Chapter 15: Nonlinear Systems
Nonlinear Systems
Describing Functions
Phase Plane
Limit Cycle
State Representation, Popov, Liapunov
Chapter 16: Optimization
Chapter 17: Digital Control Systems
Design - Controller
State - Discrete
Digital Observer
Microprocessor Control
Summary of Principles in Control Systems
Index

WHAT THIS BOOK IS FOR

Students have generally found automatic control systems / robotics a difficult subject to understand and learn. Despite the publication of hundreds of textbooks in this field, each one intended to provide an improvement over previous textbooks, students of automatic control systems / robotics continue to remain perplexed as a result of numerous subject areas that must be remembered and correlated when solving problems. Various interpretations of automatic control systems / robotics terms also contribute to the difficulties of mastering the subject.

In a study of automatic control systems / robotics, REA found the following basic reasons underlying the inherent difficulties of automatic control systems / robotics:

No systematic rules of analysis were ever developed to follow in a step-by-step manner to solve typically encountered problems. This results from numerous different conditions and principles involved in a problem that leads to many possible different solution methods. To prescribe a set of rules for each of the possible variations would involve an enormous number of additional steps, making this task more burdensome than solving the problem directly due to the expectation of much trial and error.

Current textbooks normally explain a given principle in a few pages written by an automatic control systems / robotics professional who has insight into the subject matter not shared by others. These explanations are often written in an abstract manner that causes confusion as to the principle's use and application. Explanations then are often not sufficiently detailed or extensive enough to make the reader aware of the wide range of applications and different aspects of the principle being studied. The numerous possible variations of principles and their applications are usually not discussed, and it is left to the reader to discover this while doing exercises. Accordingly, the average student is expected to rediscover that which has long been established and practiced, but not always published or adequately explained.

The examples typically following the explanation of a topic are too few in number and too simple to enable the student to obtain a thorough grasp of the involved principles. The explanations do not provide sufficient basis to solve problems that may be assigned for homework or given on examinations.

Poorly solved examples such as these can be presented in abbreviated form which leaves out much explanatory material between steps, and as a result requires the reader to figure out the missing information. This leaves the reader with an impression that the problems and even the subject are hard to learn - completely the opposite of what an example is supposed to do.

Poor examples are often worded in a confusing or obscure way. They might not state the nature of the problem or they present a solution, which appears to have no direct relation to the problem. These problems usually offer an overly general discussion - never revealing how or what is to be solved.

Many examples do not include accompanying diagrams or graphs, denying the reader the exposure necessary for drawing good diagrams and graphs. Such practice only strengthens understanding by simplifying and organizing automatic control systems / robotics processes.

Students can learn the subject only by doing the exercises themselves and reviewing them in class, obtaining experience in applying the principles with their different ramifications.

In doing the exercises by

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Contents

Chapter No Page
1
STATE SPACE REPRESENTATION
442
STATE TRANSITION MATRIX
511
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