Growing Public: Volume 2, Further Evidence: Social Spending and Economic Growth since the Eighteenth Century (Google eBook)

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Cambridge University Press, Apr 19, 2004 - Business & Economics
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Growing Public examines the question of whether social policies that redistribute income impose constraints on economic growth. What kept prospering nations from using taxes for social programs until the end of the nineteenth century? Why did taxes and spending then grow so much, and what are the prospects for social spending in this century? Why did North America become a leader in public education in some ways and not others? Lindert finds answers in the economic history and logic of political voice, population ageing, and income growth. Contrary to traditional beliefs, the net national costs of government social programs are virtually zero. This book not only shows that no Darwinian mechanism has punished the welfare states, but uses history to explain why this surprising result makes sense. Contrary to the intuition of many economists and the ideology of many politicians, social spending has contributed to, rather than inhibited, economic growth.
  

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Contents

Part Six Accounting for Social Spending Jobs and Growth
31
Appendix A Time Series on School Enrollments and Teachers 18301930
122
Appendix B Conflicting Data on Elementary School Enrollments within the United Kingdom 18511931
147
Appendix C Public and Total Educational Expenditures as Percentages of National Product since 1850
153
Appendix D Regressions Predicting Schooling Growth Social Transfers and Direct Taxes 18801930
160
Appendix E Regressions Predicting Social Spending Growth and Employment OECD 19621995
172
Appendix F Social Transfers circa 1990 versus History
194
Appendix G Postregression Accounting Formulae
198
Notes
201
Bibliography
210
Index
220
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