The Ghost at Skeleton Rock

Front Cover
Grosset & Dunlap, 1957 - Juvenile Fiction - 177 pages
6 Reviews
A cryptic message from their famous detective father and a note secreted in a ventriloquist's dummy lead Frank and Joe Hardy on a dangerous search to the tropical islands in the Caribbean. There the teen-age detectives are constantly beset by vicious henchmen of a criminal mastermind. Danger stalks the boys' every move, once in an isolated sugar mill, another time in a shark-infested sea. To add to their hazards, one of the young henchmen closely resembles Joe and fiendishly makes use of this strange coincidence. Through their resourcefulness and deductive reasoning, the brother sleuths ingeniously fit together the pieces of the baffling puzzle. The climax of this exciting mystery, when Frank and Joe come face to face with the ghost at Skeleton Rock, will be as much of a surprise to the reader as it was to the young detectives themselves. - Flyleaf.

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Review: The Ghost at Skeleton Rock (The Hardy Boys #37)

User Review  - Sticks - Goodreads

They are pretty good at flying. Read full review

Review: The Ghost at Skeleton Rock (The Hardy Boys #37)

User Review  - Lovi Timayaka - Goodreads

i want to think and solve there mysterious cases.Actually,I'm the biggest fan of hardy boys but i don't have the complete books yet.But I LOVE HARDY BOYS STORIES! Read full review

About the author (1957)

Franklin W. Dixon Franklin W. Dixon is actually a pseudonym for any number of ghostwriters who have had the distinction of writing stories for the Hardy Boys series. The series was originally created by Edward Stratmeyer in 1926, the same mastermind of the Nancy Drew detective series, Tom Swift, the Rover Boys and other characters. While Stratmeyer created the outlines for the original series, it was Canadian writer Leslie McFarlane who breathed life to the stories and created the persona Franklin W. Dixon. McFarlane wrote for the series for over twenty years and is credited with success of the early collection of stories. As the series became more popular, it was pared down, the format changed and new ghostwriters added their own flavor to the stories. Part of the draw of the Hardy Boys is that as the authors changed, so to did the times and the story lines. While there is no one true author of the series, each ghostwriter can be given credit for enhancing the life of this series and never unveiling that there really is no Franklin W. Dixon.

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