Latin Literature

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Psychology Press, 2002 - Literary Criticism - 304 pages
1 Review
This highly accessible, user-friendly work provides a fresh and illuminating introduction to the most important aspects of Latin prose and poetry.
Readers are constantly encouraged to think for themselves about how and why we study the texts in question. They are stimulated and inspired to do their own further reading through engagement with a wide selection of translated extracts, and with a useful exploration of the different ways in which they can be approached. Central throughout is the theme of the fundamental connections between Latin literature and issues of elite Roman culture.
The versatile structure of the book makes it suitable both for individual and class use.
  

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Review: Latin Literature

User Review  - Brian - Goodreads

Sussana Braund sets out clearly and with a refreshing lack of scholarly obfuscation a range of critical responses, both traditional and contemporary, to canonical and non-canonical texts. Declaring ... Read full review

Contents

Virgil and the meaning of the Aeneid
1
Role models for Roman women and men in Livy
20
What is Latin literature?
37
What does studying Latin literature involve?
53
Making Roman identity multiculturalism militarism and masculinity
70
Performance and spectacle life and death
89
Intersections of power praise politics and patrons
110
Annihilation and abjection living death and living slavery
133
Allegory
225
Overcoming an inferiority complex the relationship with Greek literature
242
Building Rome and building Roman literature
265
Extract from Darkness Visible
275
Whos afraid of literary theory?
277
Authors and texts
288
Timeline
294
Translations usedadapted
296

Writing real lives
152
Introspection and individual identity
176
Literary texture and intertextuality
190
Metapoetics
207

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About the author (2002)

Susanna Morton Braund is Professor of Classics, Stanford University.

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