The Early Palaeologan Renaissance (1261-c. 1360): By Edmund Fryde

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BRILL, 2000 - History - 423 pages
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The Byzantine world underwent a remarkable recovery of intellectual energy in the period following the recovery of Constantinople in 1261. The reaction of the emperors and their entourage of well-educated high officials to their political disasters was a deliberate revival of the glories of ancient Greek culture. The main subject of this book is the preservation and dissemination by this learned elite of such ancient literature, philosophy and science as still survived then, the development of editorial techniques which resulted in more complete and less corrupt texts, and their improvement buy the addition of commentaries and other innovations.
  

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Contents

Introduction
1
The Preservation of Greek Literature
15
From c 1000 to the Disaster of the Fourth
38
The Beginnings of the Palaeologan
82
Translations from Greek into Latin Chiefly
103
Philological Scholarship c 1280c 1330
144
The Scholarly and Literary Audience for
167
Philosophy
183
Demetrios Triklinios
268
Manuel Moschopulos Thomas Magistros
295
Theodore Metochites
322
Science Astronomy Mathematics
337
Nikephoros Gregoras
357
The Twilight of the Scholarly
374
A Comparison Between the Byzantine
388
Indices
407

Higher Education and Rhetoric
213
Maximos Planudes 12551305
226

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About the author (2000)

Edmund Fryde F.B.A. was professor of History at the University of Wales, Aberystwyth.

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