Aggressive Behavior: Current Perspectives

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L.Rowell Huesmann
Springer Science & Business Media, Mar 31, 1994 - Psychology - 305 pages
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In this important work twelve eminent scholars review the latest theoretical work on human aggressive behavior. Emerging theories of aggression; peers, sex-roles, and aggression; environmental investigation and mitigation of aggression; development of adult aggression; and group aggression in adolescents and adults are all discussed in detail to provide clinicians, researchers, and students with a cutting-edge overview of the field.

  

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Contents

EMERGING THEORIES OF HUMAN AGGRESSION
1
THEORIES OF AGGRESSION From Drives to Cognitions
3
SOCIAL LEARNING THEORY
4
LONGITUDINAL DATA
5
SOCIAL COGNITIVE THEORY
7
CONCLUSIONS
9
MORAL COGNITION AND CHILDHOOD AGGRESSION
13
THE ROLE OF COGNITION IN CHILDRENS AGGRESSIVE BEHAVIOR
14
LONGTERM EFFECTS OF REPEATED EXPOSURE TO MEDIA VIOLENCE IN CHILDHOOD
153
AGGRESSIVE BEHAVIOR
155
THE SOCIALIZATION PROCESS FOR CHILDREN
158
COGNITIVE PROCESSES AND THE LEARNING OF AGGRESSION
159
SCRIPT THEORY AND LEARNING FROM MEDIA VIOLENCE
161
EXPERIMENTAL STUDIES OF TV VIOLENCE AND AGGRESSION
162
STATIC OBSERVATIONAL STUDIES OF TV VIOLENCE AND AGGRESSION
163
LONGITUDINAL OBSERVATIONAL STUDIES OF TV VIOLENCE
164

THE RELATION BETWEEN MORAL DEVELOPMENT AND CHILDRENS AGGRESSIVE BEHAVIOR
19
THE DOMAIN MODEL OF THE DEVELOPMENT OF SOCIAL REASONING
21
AN INTEGRATIVE MODEL OF THE RELATION BETWEEN MORAL COGNITION AND AGGRESSION
25
CONTEXTUALIZED JUDGMENTS AND AGGRESSIVE BEHAVIOR
26
SUMMARY
29
IS SOMETHING MISSING? Some Observations Prompted by the CognitiveNeoassociationist View of Anger and Emotional Aggression
35
THE CONVENTIONAL ACCOUNT
36
NEGLECTED OBSERVATIONS
37
WHY THE NEGLECT OF THESE FINDINGS?
40
THE COGNITIVE NEOASSOCIATIONISTIC APPROACH
41
NEGATIVE AFFECTANGERAGGRESSION ASSOCIATIONS
42
SELFREGULATION OF THE AFFECTACTIVATED SYNDROME
50
CONSTRUCTION OF THE MORE ELABORATE EMOTIONAL EXPERIENCE
52
CONCLUSION
54
PEERS SEX ROLES AND AGGRESSION
59
PEER ADAPTATIONS IN THE DEVELOPMENT OF ANTISOCIAL BEHAVIOR A Confluence Model
61
THE COERCION MODEL
63
PEER REACTIONS
64
PEER SELECTION
66
FRIENDSHIP INTERACTION
68
SUMMARY
69
SAMPLE
70
SUBSAMPLE SELECTION
71
CHILD ANTISOCIAL AT AGES 10 12 14
72
COERCION HYPOTHESIS
73
DEVIANCY TRAINING
76
PARALLEL CONTINUITY
77
FRIENDSHIP AND DEVIANCY
82
APPLIED IMPLICATIONS
84
SCORING AND SCALING PROCEDURES SOCIOMETRIC STATUS AGE 10
86
PEER ANTISOCIAL BEHAVIOR AT AGE 10
87
PEER INTERACTION TASK
88
DELINQUENT TALK AT AGE 14
90
BULLYING AT SCHOOL LongTerm Outcomes for the Victims and an Effective SchoolBased Intervention Program
97
A DEFINITION OF BULLYING
98
PREVALENCE OF BULLYING
99
LONGTERM OUTCOMES OF BULLYING BY PEERS IN SCHOOL
101
RESULTS AND DISCUSSION
103
SUMMARY OF STUDY 1 AND MAJOR IMPLICATIONS
109
EFFECTS OF A SCHOOLBASED INTERVENTION PROGRAM AGAINST BULLYING
113
SUBJECTS AND DESIGN
115
RESULTS
116
QUALITY OF DATA AND POSSIBLE ALTERNATIVE INTERPRETATIONS
119
BRIEF COMMENTS
121
SOME POSSIBLE REASONS FOR PROGRAM EFFECTIVENESS
123
CONCLUSION
127
INDIRECT AGGRESSION IN BOYS AND GIRLS
131
INDIRECT AGGRESSION
133
FRIENDSHIP PATTERNS
135
THE QUESTIONNAIRES AND THE INTERVIEWS
137
SUMMED VARIABLES OF DIRECT AND INDIRECT AGGRESSION
139
DISCUSSION
146
ENVIRONMENTAL INSTIGATION AND MITIGATION OF AGGRESSION
151
THE 10 AND 22YEAR NEW YORK STATE STUDIES
166
A CROSSNATIONAL LONGITUDINAL STUDY
170
A NETHERLANDS STUDY
176
AN NBC STUDY
177
A SOUTH AFRICAN STUDY
179
METAANALYTIC REVIEWS
180
RISK AND RESOURCEVARIABLES IN CHILDRENS AGGRESSIVE BEHAVIOR A TwoYear Longitudinal Study
187
RISK FACTORS AND AGGRESSION
188
RESOURCE VARIABLES AND AGGRESSION
189
METHOD
192
PROCEDURES
193
RELATION BETWEEN SPECIFIC RISK FOR AGGRESSION INDEX AND LATER AGGRESSION
197
CROSSSECTIONAL CORRELATIONS AMONG RISK RESOURCE AND AGGRESSION VARIABLES
199
TIME 1 AND TIME 2 RISK AND RESOURCE VARIABLES AS PREDICTORS OF AGGRESSION
201
DISCUSSION
203
COMPENSATORY AND PROTECTIVE EFFECTS OF SOCIAL SUPPORT AND SOCIAL PROBLEMSOLVING SKILLS
205
LIMITATIONS AND CONCLUSIONS
207
DEVELOPMENT OF ADULT AGGRESSION
213
CHILDHOOD ADOLESCENT AND ADULT FEATURES OF VIOLENT MALES
215
THE CAMBRIDGE STUDY
218
PREVIOUS ANALYSES OF AGGRESSION AND VIOLENCE
220
SOCCER HOOLIGANS
222
CASE HISTORIES OF SOCCER HOOLIGANISM
223
PREDICTORS OF VIOLENCE
226
CORRELATES OF VIOLENCE
230
INDEPENDENT EXPLANATORY PREDICTORS
234
CONCLUSIONS
236
AGGRESSION IN TWO GENERATIONS
241
PERSONENVIRONMENT INTERACTION
242
Two HYPOTHESES
243
METHOD
244
RESULTS
246
DISCUSSION
247
GROUP AGGRESSION IN ADOLESCENTS AND ADULTS
253
DELINQUENT GANGS
255
DELINQUENT GANG THEORY
257
STRAIN THEORY
258
LABELING THEORY
259
DETACHED WORKERS
262
OPPORTUNITIES PROVISION
265
OPPORTUNITY WITHDRAWAL AND THE RISE OF DETERRENCE INCARCERATION
266
COMPREHENSIVE PROGRAMMING
267
SUMMARY
270
NATIONALISM PATRIOTISM AND AGGRESSION A Clarification of Functional Differences
275
WARS AND AGGRESSION
276
INDIVIDUAL DIFFERENCES IN SUPPORT FOR WAR
277
PATRIOTISM AND NATIONALISM
278
MILITANT MUSIC PATRIOTISM AND NATIONALISM
281
METHODS
284
RESULTS
285
DISCUSSION AND CONCLUSIONS
288
INDEX
293
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About the author (1994)

Huesmann is professor of psychology at the University of Michigan.

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