The Ethics of Memory

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Harvard University Press, 2002 - Philosophy - 227 pages
6 Reviews

Much of the intense current interest in collective memory concerns the politics of memory. In a book that asks, "Is there an ethics of memory?" Avishai Margalit addresses a separate, perhaps more pressing, set of concerns.

The idea he pursues is that the past, connecting people to each other, makes possible the kinds of "thick" relations we can call truly ethical. Thick relations, he argues, are those that we have with family and friends, lovers and neighbors, our tribe and our nation--and they are all dependent on shared memories. But we also have "thin" relations with total strangers, people with whom we have nothing in common except our common humanity. A central idea of the ethics of memory is that when radical evil attacks our shared humanity, we ought as human beings to remember the victims.

Margalit's work offers a philosophy for our time, when, in the wake of overwhelming atrocities, memory can seem more crippling than liberating, a force more for revenge than for reconciliation. Morally powerful, deeply learned, and elegantly written, The Ethics of Memory draws on the resources of millennia of Western philosophy and religion to provide us with healing ideas that will engage all of us who care about the nature of our relations to others.

  

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Review: The Ethics of Memory

User Review  - Tim and Popie Stafford - Goodreads

I like his writing.... but it is philosophy, which means for me there are all sorts of fascinating points made that I can't remember or apply at the end. He's respectful of religion, and uses many ... Read full review

Review: The Ethics of Memory

User Review  - Dave Peticolas - Goodreads

A philosopher explores our obligation to remember the past. Read full review

Contents

Introduction
1
Intensive Care
18
Past Continuous
48
The Kernel
84
Emotions Recollected
107
A Moral Witness
147
Forgiving and Forgetting
183
Notes
211
Index
221
Copyright

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About the author (2002)

Avishai Margalit is the Schulman Professor of Philosophy at the Hebrew University of Jerusalem. He is also the George F. Kennan Professor in the School of Historical Studies at the Institute for Advanced Studies. He writes regularly for the "New York Review of Books".

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