History of England from the Peace of Utrecht to the Peace of Aix-la-Chaoelle (to the Peace of Versailles (Google eBook)

Front Cover
1837
0 Reviews
  

What people are saying - Write a review

We haven't found any reviews in the usual places.

Selected pages

Common terms and phrases

Popular passages

Page 348 - ... their manner of writing is very peculiar, being neither from the left to the right, like the Europeans ; nor from the right to the left, like the Arabians ; nor from up to down, like the Chinese ; but aslant, from one corner of the paper to the other, like ladies in England.
Page l - ... talked to him as if he had been really present, and answered my own questions in my lord's voice as nearly as I could imitate it. I walked up and down, as if we were conversing together, till I thought they had time enough thoroughly to clear themselves of the guards. I then thought proper to make off also. I opened the door, and stood half in it, that those in the outward chamber might hear what I said ; but held it so close, that they could not look in. I bid my lord a formal farewell for that...
Page 97 - that were lean, or shorn, or scabby, I would be " none of his customer. I have heard of a man who " had a mind to sell his house, and therefore carried " a piece of brick in his pocket, which he showed " as a pattern, to encourage purchasers ; and this " is directly the case in point with Mr. Wood's
Page 327 - The truth is, that the spectators are always in their senses, and know, from the first act to the last, that the stage is only a stage, and that the players are only players.
Page 348 - I shall say but little at present of their Learning, which for many Ages hath flourished in all its Branches among them : But their manner of Writing is very peculiar, being neither from the Left to the Right, like the Europeans ; nor from the Right to the Left, like the Arabians ; nor from up to down, like the Chinese , nor from down to up, like the Cascagians ; but aslant from one Corner of the Paper to the other, like Ladies in England.
Page 191 - That it is an indignity to , and a breach of the privilege of this house , for any person to presume to give, in written or printed newspapers, any account or minutes of the debates, or other proceedings of this house or of any committee thereof; and that upon discovery of the outhors , etc. this house will proceed against the offenders with the utmost severity.
Page 337 - I don't know how it is, but she said very right : there is something in Spenser that pleases one as strongly in one's old age, as it did in one's youth. I read the Faerie Queene, when I was about twelve, with infinite delight; and I think it gave me as much, when I read it over about a year or two ago.
Page 175 - And sensible soft melancholy. "Has she no faults then, (Envy says) Sir?" Yes, she has one, I must aver; When all the world conspires to praise her, The woman's deaf, and does not hear.
Page 384 - An't please your worship, they have convarted my wife. Till she went among them, she had such a tongue; and now she is as quiet as a lamb.' ' Carry them back, carry them back,' replied the Justice, ' and let them convert all the scolds in the town.
Page 64 - The plots, in that kingdom, are usually the workmanship of those persons who desire to raise their own characters of profound politicians; to restore new vigour to a crazy administration; to stifle or divert general discontents; to fill their coffers with forfeitures; and raise, or sink the opinion of public credit, as either shall best answer their private advantage.

Bibliographic information