The Portable Hawthorne (Google eBook)

Front Cover
Penguin, Nov 29, 2005 - Fiction - 464 pages
4 Reviews
The Portable Hawthorne includes writings from each major stage in the career of Nathaniel Hawthorne: a number of his most intriguing early tales, all of The Scarlet Letter, excerpts from his three subsequently published romances—The House of Seven Gables, The Blithedale Romance, and The Marble Faun—as well as passages from his European journals and a sampling of his last, unfinished works. The editor’s introduction and head notes trace the evolution of Hawthorne’s writing over the course of his long career: from the tales, to their apotheosis in The Scarlet Letter, through his popular romances, to his private journals and frustrated attempts at another romance. Readers looking for a critical vantage point from which to see Hawthorne whole—his artistic rise, triumph, and sad decline—can find it in this collection.

 


  

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LibraryThing Review

User Review  - jburlinson - LibraryThing

When I was a college student, I used to write papers for hire, nearly all for freshman English classes. It didn't hurt that I was sometimes the grader also, having been hired by two professors to read ... Read full review

Review: The Portable Hawthorne

User Review  - Christopher - Goodreads

A great sampling of Hawthorne's works. Includes "The Man of Adamant," "The Birth-Mark," "Young Goodman Brown," "Roger Malvin's Burial," and The Scarlet Letter, among others. Hawthorne is a good writer, to say the least. Read full review

Contents

Liverpool August 1853
Liverpool December 1853
Liverpool February 1855
London September 1855
Liverpool March 1856
London August 1856
Peterborough May 1857
Southport June 1857
Rome April 1858
Florence June 1858
Florence September 1858
Marseilles May 1859
TO HORATIO BRIDGE OCTOBER 1861
TO FRANCIS BENNOCH LONDON OCTOBER 1862
TO JAMES T FIELDS OCTOBER 1863
TO JAMES T FIELDS DECEMBER 1863

Linlithgow July 1857
London December 1857
Rome February 1858
TO HENRY WADSWORTH LONGFELLOW JANUARY 1864
TO JAMES T FIELDS FEBRUARY 1864
Copyright

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About the author (2005)

Nathaniel Hawthorne was born on July 4, 1804, in Salem, Massachusetts, the son and grandson of proud New England seafarers. He lived in genteel poverty with his widowed mother and two young sisters in a house filled with Puritan ideals and family pride in a prosperous past. His boyhood was, in most respects, pleasant and normal. In 1825 he was graduated from Bowdoin College, Brunswick, Maine, and he returned to Salem determined to become a writer of short stories. For the next twelve years he was plagued with unhappiness and self-doubts as he struggled to master his craft. He finally secured some small measure of success with the publication of his Twice-Told Tales (1837). His marriage to Sophia Peabody in 1842 was a happy one. The Scarlet Letter (1850), which brought him immediate recognition, was followed by The House of the Seven Gables (1851). After serving four years as the American Consul in Liverpool, England, he traveled in Italy; he returned home to Massachusetts in 1860. Depressed, weary of writing, and failing in health, he died on May 19, 1864, at Plymouth, New Hampshire.

William C. Spengemann is the Hale Professor in Arts and Sciences and Professor of English Emeritus at Dartmouth College. He edited the Penguin Classics edition of Nineteenth-Century American Poetry.

Nathaniel Hawthorne was born on July 4, 1804, in Salem, Massachusetts, the son and grandson of proud New England seafarers. He lived in genteel poverty with his widowed mother and two young sisters in a house filled with Puritan ideals and family pride in a prosperous past. His boyhood was, in most respects, pleasant and normal. In 1825 he was graduated from Bowdoin College, Brunswick, Maine, and he returned to Salem determined to become a writer of short stories. For the next twelve years he was plagued with unhappiness and self-doubts as he struggled to master his craft. He finally secured some small measure of success with the publication of his Twice-Told Tales (1837). His marriage to Sophia Peabody in 1842 was a happy one. The Scarlet Letter (1850), which brought him immediate recognition, was followed by The House of the Seven Gables (1851). After serving four years as the American Consul in Liverpool, England, he traveled in Italy; he returned home to Massachusetts in 1860. Depressed, weary of writing, and failing in health, he died on May 19, 1864, at Plymouth, New Hampshire.

William C. Spengemann is the Hale Professor in Arts and Sciences and Professor of English Emeritus at Dartmouth College. He edited the Penguin Classics edition of Nineteenth-Century American Poetry.

Bibliographic information