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Books Books 1 - 10 of 10 on All striving is vain,' will never reign supreme, for the impulse to take life strivingly....  
" All striving is vain,' will never reign supreme, for the impulse to take life strivingly is indestructible in the race. Moral creeds which speak to that impulse will be widely successful in spite of inconsistency, vagueness, and shadowy determination... "
The Sentiment of Rationality - Page 88
by William James - 1905 - 48 pages
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The Princeton Review, Volume 58

Theology - 1882
...man's nature was in harmony with the nature of things, if only the paralyzing corruptions of custorn would stand from between ? How did Kant and Fichte,...be unfit for a valetudinarian poet. In other words, altho one can lay down in advance the rule that a philosophy which utterly denies all fundamental ground...
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The Principles of Psychology, Volume 2

William James - Psychology - 1908
...impulse will be widely successful m spite of inconsistency, vagueness, and shadowy determination oí expectancy. Man needs a rule for his will, and will invent one if one be not given him." After the emotional and active needs come the intellectual and »esthetic ones. The two great aesthetic...
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The Principles of Psychology, Volume 2

William James - Psychology - 1890
...the race. MoraTcreeds which speak fo that impulse will be widely successful m spite of mconsistency, vagueness, and shadowy determination of expectancy. Man needs a rule for his will, and will mvent one if one be not given him." After the emotional and active needs come the intellectual and...
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The will to believe: and other essays in popular philosophy

William James - Belief and doubt - 1896 - 332 pages
...widely succcssfuTTn 'splTe'of~inconsistcncy._yague-_ ness, and shadowy determination of expcctancy___ Man needs a rule for his will, and will invent one if oqe T^g~^ not given him. ' " But now observe a most important consequence. Men's active impulses are...
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Some Modern French Writers: A Study in Bergsonism

Gladys Turquet-Milnes, Henri Bergson - French literature - 1921 - 302 pages
...William James. Indeed Taine and Bourget are living examples of the truth of William James's words, "Man needs a rule for his will, and will invent one if one be not given him. "| Even children love fights, and flying flags, and beating drums, as well as a general building and...
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Writings, 1878-1899

William James - Literary Collections - 1992 - 1212 pages
...of our emotional and practical tendencies. Fatalism, whose solving word in all crises of behaviour is 'All striving is vain,' will never reign supreme,...will, and will invent one if one be not given him." After the emotional and active needs come the intellectual and aesthetic ones. The two great aesthetic...
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The Columbia Dictionary of Quotations

Robert Andrews - Reference - 1993 - 1092 pages
...after it. ALDOUS HUXLEY (1894-1963). Briiish auihor. Do What You Will, "Pascal." scl. 23 (1929). 9 WILLIAM JAMES (1842-1910). US psychologist, philosopher. Principles of Psychology, vol. 2, ch. 21 (1890),...
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The Cambridge Companion to William James

Ruth Anna Putnam - Philosophy - 1997 - 406 pages
...strivingly is indestructible in the race. Moral creeds which speak to that impulse will be widely sucessful in spite of inconsistency, vagueness, and shadowy...needs a rule for his will, and will invent one if one not be given to him. (WB, 74-5) What we need is a view of the world which will appeal to our active...
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William James in Russian Culture

Joan Delaney Grossman, Ruth Rischin - Literary Criticism - 2003 - 259 pages
...simply fatalistic can satisfy man, because "to take life strivingly is indestructible in the race. . . . Man needs a rule for his will, and will invent one if one be not given him" ("The Psychology of Belief," p. 1053). James therefore questions Tolstoyan "fatalism" even as he embraces...
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The Relevance of Whitehead: Philosophical Essays in Commemoration ..., Volume 10

Ivor Leclerc - Philosophy - 2004 - 383 pages
...restraint. William James wrote in his first notable pragmatistic essay, "The Sentiment of Rationality": "Man needs a rule for his will, and will invent one if one be not given him."" It is the business of a complete philosophy to give him a rule — but not the business of metaphysics....
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