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Books Books 1 - 8 of 8 on A nameless unheimlichkeit comes over us at the thought of there being nothing eternal....  
" A nameless unheimlichkeit comes over us at the thought of there being nothing eternal in our final purposes, in the objects of those loves and aspirations which are our deepest energies. The monstrously lopsided equation of the universe and its knower,... "
The Sentiment of Rationality - Page 84
by William James - 1905 - 48 pages
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The Principles of Psychology, Volume 2

William James - Psychology - 1908
...motives to act, but no power ; here we have powers, but no motives. A nameless Unheimlichkeit cornos over us at the thought of there being nothing eternal...the Cosmos impinges upon each one of us, each one desire« to feel that his reaction at that point is congruous with the demands of the vast whole, that...
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The Monist, Volume 19

Edward C. Hegeler - Philosophy - 1909
...therefore, first of all will, and Mr. James is accordingly a voluntarist. 3. He demands in the universe "a character for which our emotions and active propensities shall be a match" (Psych., II, 313, 1882). He believes in a God who is also will, a will sacred from our own, who is...
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The Principles of Psychology, Vol. 2

William James
...there being nothing eternal in our final purposes, in the objects of those loves and aspirations whwh are our deepest energies. The monstrously lopsided...congruous with the demands of the vast whole, that he balanees the latter, so to speak, and is able to do what it expects of him. But as his abilities to...
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William James's Radical Reconstruction of Philosophy

Charlene Haddock Seigfried - Philosophy - 1990 - 433 pages
...reality, then what could motivate us to the expansive use of our powers? We demand of the universe "a character for which our emotions and active propensities shall be a match" (PP,II, 941). "It is far too little recognized how entirely the intellect is built up of practical...
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The Divided Self of William James

Richard M. Gale - Medical - 1999 - 364 pages
...the objects of almost all the impulses which we most cherish. . . . We demand in it [the universe] a character for which our emotions and active propensities shall be a match. (PP 940-1) Any philosophy that presents a view of the world that is devoid of human significance is...
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Early Defenders of Pragmatism: An Introduction to the Theory of ..., Volume 2

John Elof Boodin - Philosophy - 2001 - 364 pages
...to the objects of almost all the impulses which we most cherish... . We demand in it [the universe] a character for which our emotions and active propensities shall be a match (PP pp. 940-41). Any philosophy that presents a view of the world that is devoid of human significance...
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Radical Interpretation in Religion

Nancy Frankenberry - Philosophy - 2002 - 231 pages
...objects of those loves and aspirations which are our deepest energies... We demand in [the universe] a character for which our emotions and active propensities shall be a match. "4 This passage, and a later one in which James says that the "need of an eternal moral order is one...
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The Principles of Psychology, Volume 2

William James - Psychology - 2007 - 712 pages
...paralleled by the no less lopsided equation of the universe and the doer. We demand in it a Aaraeter for which our emotions and active propensities shall...congruous with the demands of the vast whole, that be balances the latter, so to speak, and is able to do what it expects of Mm. But as his abilities...
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